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The role of hybridization in the evolution of sexual system diversity in a clonal, aquatic plant.

Abstract

The stable coexistence within populations of females, males, and hermaphrodites (subdioecy) is enigmatic because theoretical models indicate that maintenance of this sexual system involves highly restricted conditions. Subdioecy is more commonly interpreted as a transitory stage along the gynodioecious pathway from hermaphroditism to dioecy. The widespread, North American, aquatic plant Sagittaria latifolia is largely composed of monoecious or dioecious populations; however, subdioecious populations with high frequencies of hermaphrodites (mean frequency = 0.50) characterize the northern range boundary of dioecy in eastern North America. We investigated two hypotheses for the origin of subdioecy in this region. Using polymorphic microsatellite loci, we evaluated whether subdioecy arises through selection on standing genetic variation for male sex inconstancy in dioecious populations, or results from hybridization between monoecious and dioecious populations. We found evidence for both pathways to subdioecy, although hybridization was the more common mechanism, with genetic evidence of admixture in nine of 14 subdioecious populations examined. Hybridization has also played a role in the origin of androdioecious populations in S. latifolia, a mechanism not often considered in the evolution of this rare sexual system. Our study demonstrates how hybridization has the potential to play a role in the diversification of plant sexual systems.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3B2, Canada. sarah.yakimowski@queensu.ca. Current Address: Department of Biology, Queen's University, 116 Barrie Street, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6, Canada. sarah.yakimowski@queensu.ca.

    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3B2, Canada.

    Source

    MeSH

    Biological Evolution
    Canada
    Hybridization, Genetic
    Microsatellite Repeats
    Polymorphism, Genetic
    Reproduction
    Sagittaria
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27150128

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - The role of hybridization in the evolution of sexual system diversity in a clonal, aquatic plant. AU - Yakimowski,Sarah B, AU - Barrett,Spencer C H, Y1 - 2016/06/01/ PY - 2016/02/05/received PY - 2016/04/21/revised PY - 2016/04/26/accepted PY - 2016/5/7/entrez PY - 2016/5/7/pubmed PY - 2017/9/21/medline KW - Dioecy KW - Sagittaria KW - gender strategies KW - hybridization KW - monoecy SP - 1200 EP - 11 JF - Evolution; international journal of organic evolution JO - Evolution VL - 70 IS - 6 N2 - The stable coexistence within populations of females, males, and hermaphrodites (subdioecy) is enigmatic because theoretical models indicate that maintenance of this sexual system involves highly restricted conditions. Subdioecy is more commonly interpreted as a transitory stage along the gynodioecious pathway from hermaphroditism to dioecy. The widespread, North American, aquatic plant Sagittaria latifolia is largely composed of monoecious or dioecious populations; however, subdioecious populations with high frequencies of hermaphrodites (mean frequency = 0.50) characterize the northern range boundary of dioecy in eastern North America. We investigated two hypotheses for the origin of subdioecy in this region. Using polymorphic microsatellite loci, we evaluated whether subdioecy arises through selection on standing genetic variation for male sex inconstancy in dioecious populations, or results from hybridization between monoecious and dioecious populations. We found evidence for both pathways to subdioecy, although hybridization was the more common mechanism, with genetic evidence of admixture in nine of 14 subdioecious populations examined. Hybridization has also played a role in the origin of androdioecious populations in S. latifolia, a mechanism not often considered in the evolution of this rare sexual system. Our study demonstrates how hybridization has the potential to play a role in the diversification of plant sexual systems. SN - 1558-5646 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27150128/The_role_of_hybridization_in_the_evolution_of_sexual_system_diversity_in_a_clonal_aquatic_plant_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12941 ER -