Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

An update of the WCRF/AICR systematic literature review on esophageal and gastric cancers and citrus fruits intake.
Cancer Causes Control 2016; 27(7):837-51CC

Abstract

PURPOSE

The 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research expert report concluded that foods containing vitamin C probably protect against esophageal cancer and fruits probably protect against gastric cancer. Most of the previous evidence was from case-control studies, which may be affected by recall and selection biases. More recently, several cohort studies have examined these associations. We conducted a systematic literature review of prospective studies on citrus fruits intake and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers.

METHODS

PubMed was searched for studies published until 1 March 2016. We calculated summary relative risks and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) using random-effects models.

RESULTS

With each 100 g/day increase of citrus fruits intake, a marginally significant decreased risk of esophageal cancer was observed (summary RR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.74-1.00, 1,057 cases, six studies). The associations were similar for squamous cell carcinoma (RR 0.87, 95 % CI 0.69-1.08, three studies) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (RR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.78-1.11, three studies). For gastric cancer, the nonsignificant inverse association was observed for gastric cardia cancer (RR 0.75, 95 % CI 0.55-1.01, three studies), but not for gastric non-cardia cancer (RR 1.02, 95 % CI 0.90-1.16, four studies). Consistent summary inverse associations were observed when comparing the highest with lowest intake, with statistically significant associations for esophageal (RR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.64-0.91, seven studies) and gastric cardia cancers (RR 0.62, 95 % CI 0.39-0.99, three studies).

CONCLUSIONS

Citrus fruits may decrease the risk of esophageal and gastric cardia cancers, but further studies are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK. s.vingeliene@imperial.ac.uk.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK. Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK.Division of Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27153845

Citation

Vingeliene, Snieguole, et al. "An Update of the WCRF/AICR Systematic Literature Review On Esophageal and Gastric Cancers and Citrus Fruits Intake." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 27, no. 7, 2016, pp. 837-51.
Vingeliene S, Chan DS, Aune D, et al. An update of the WCRF/AICR systematic literature review on esophageal and gastric cancers and citrus fruits intake. Cancer Causes Control. 2016;27(7):837-51.
Vingeliene, S., Chan, D. S., Aune, D., Vieira, A. R., Polemiti, E., Stevens, C., ... Norat, T. (2016). An update of the WCRF/AICR systematic literature review on esophageal and gastric cancers and citrus fruits intake. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 27(7), pp. 837-51. doi:10.1007/s10552-016-0755-0.
Vingeliene S, et al. An Update of the WCRF/AICR Systematic Literature Review On Esophageal and Gastric Cancers and Citrus Fruits Intake. Cancer Causes Control. 2016;27(7):837-51. PubMed PMID: 27153845.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An update of the WCRF/AICR systematic literature review on esophageal and gastric cancers and citrus fruits intake. AU - Vingeliene,Snieguole, AU - Chan,Doris S M, AU - Aune,Dagfinn, AU - Vieira,Ana R, AU - Polemiti,Elli, AU - Stevens,Christophe, AU - Abar,Leila, AU - Rosenblatt,Deborah Navarro, AU - Greenwood,Darren C, AU - Norat,Teresa, Y1 - 2016/05/06/ PY - 2015/05/14/received PY - 2016/04/27/accepted PY - 2016/5/8/entrez PY - 2016/5/8/pubmed PY - 2017/2/6/medline KW - Citrus fruits KW - Esophageal cancer KW - Gastric cancer KW - Meta-analysis KW - Systematic literature review SP - 837 EP - 51 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 27 IS - 7 N2 - PURPOSE: The 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research expert report concluded that foods containing vitamin C probably protect against esophageal cancer and fruits probably protect against gastric cancer. Most of the previous evidence was from case-control studies, which may be affected by recall and selection biases. More recently, several cohort studies have examined these associations. We conducted a systematic literature review of prospective studies on citrus fruits intake and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers. METHODS: PubMed was searched for studies published until 1 March 2016. We calculated summary relative risks and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) using random-effects models. RESULTS: With each 100 g/day increase of citrus fruits intake, a marginally significant decreased risk of esophageal cancer was observed (summary RR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.74-1.00, 1,057 cases, six studies). The associations were similar for squamous cell carcinoma (RR 0.87, 95 % CI 0.69-1.08, three studies) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (RR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.78-1.11, three studies). For gastric cancer, the nonsignificant inverse association was observed for gastric cardia cancer (RR 0.75, 95 % CI 0.55-1.01, three studies), but not for gastric non-cardia cancer (RR 1.02, 95 % CI 0.90-1.16, four studies). Consistent summary inverse associations were observed when comparing the highest with lowest intake, with statistically significant associations for esophageal (RR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.64-0.91, seven studies) and gastric cardia cancers (RR 0.62, 95 % CI 0.39-0.99, three studies). CONCLUSIONS: Citrus fruits may decrease the risk of esophageal and gastric cardia cancers, but further studies are needed. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27153845/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-016-0755-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -