Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Adverse impact of low skeletal muscle index on the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatic resection.
Int J Surg. 2016 Jun; 30:136-42.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Skeletal muscle depletion predicts poor prognosis of patients with certain cancers. However, the correlation between low skeletal muscle index (SMI) and the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is not well understood.

METHODS

To determine their influence on prognosis, skeletal muscle index (SMI) and visceral fat area (VFA) were measured using computed tomography at the level of the third lumbar vertebra of 195 patients who underwent primary hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We defined sarcopenia using cutoff values for SMI as 43.75 cm(2)/m(2) and 41.10 cm(2)/m(2) for males and females, respectively.

RESULTS

Sarcopenia was present in 89 of 195 (45.6%) patients and correlated significantly (P < 0.001) with female sex, low body mass index (BMI), low subcutaneous fat area, low VFA, and low serum albumin levels. There was a trend indicating the association of sarcopenia with poor cumulative recurrence rate (CRR) (P = 0.13). In patients with BMI ≥22, CRR was significantly different between patients with or without sarcopenia (19.0 or 35.2 months, respectively, P = 0.03). In contrast, there was no significant difference in patients with BMI ≥22 as a function of VFA (P = 0.47). When the cohort was limited to patients with BMI ≥22, multivariate analysis showed that sarcopenia was a significant independent risk factor for recurrence (hazard ratio = 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.5; P = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

Low-SMI was an independent adverse prognostic factor for CRR in patients with BMI ≥22. Therefore, preventing muscle wasting may improve the CRR of patients with HCC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. Electronic address: n.yabusaki@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp.Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27154615

Citation

Yabusaki, Norimitsu, et al. "Adverse Impact of Low Skeletal Muscle Index On the Prognosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Hepatic Resection." International Journal of Surgery (London, England), vol. 30, 2016, pp. 136-42.
Yabusaki N, Fujii T, Yamada S, et al. Adverse impact of low skeletal muscle index on the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatic resection. Int J Surg. 2016;30:136-42.
Yabusaki, N., Fujii, T., Yamada, S., Suzuki, K., Sugimoto, H., Kanda, M., Nakayama, G., Koike, M., Fujiwara, M., & Kodera, Y. (2016). Adverse impact of low skeletal muscle index on the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatic resection. International Journal of Surgery (London, England), 30, 136-42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsu.2016.04.049
Yabusaki N, et al. Adverse Impact of Low Skeletal Muscle Index On the Prognosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Hepatic Resection. Int J Surg. 2016;30:136-42. PubMed PMID: 27154615.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adverse impact of low skeletal muscle index on the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatic resection. AU - Yabusaki,Norimitsu, AU - Fujii,Tsutomu, AU - Yamada,Suguru, AU - Suzuki,Kojiro, AU - Sugimoto,Hiroyuki, AU - Kanda,Mitsuro, AU - Nakayama,Goro, AU - Koike,Masahiko, AU - Fujiwara,Michitaka, AU - Kodera,Yasuhiro, Y1 - 2016/05/04/ PY - 2016/01/26/received PY - 2016/03/31/revised PY - 2016/04/28/accepted PY - 2016/5/8/entrez PY - 2016/5/8/pubmed PY - 2017/2/25/medline KW - Body composition KW - Hepatocellular carcinoma KW - Prognosis KW - Sarcopenia SP - 136 EP - 42 JF - International journal of surgery (London, England) JO - Int J Surg VL - 30 N2 - BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle depletion predicts poor prognosis of patients with certain cancers. However, the correlation between low skeletal muscle index (SMI) and the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is not well understood. METHODS: To determine their influence on prognosis, skeletal muscle index (SMI) and visceral fat area (VFA) were measured using computed tomography at the level of the third lumbar vertebra of 195 patients who underwent primary hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We defined sarcopenia using cutoff values for SMI as 43.75 cm(2)/m(2) and 41.10 cm(2)/m(2) for males and females, respectively. RESULTS: Sarcopenia was present in 89 of 195 (45.6%) patients and correlated significantly (P < 0.001) with female sex, low body mass index (BMI), low subcutaneous fat area, low VFA, and low serum albumin levels. There was a trend indicating the association of sarcopenia with poor cumulative recurrence rate (CRR) (P = 0.13). In patients with BMI ≥22, CRR was significantly different between patients with or without sarcopenia (19.0 or 35.2 months, respectively, P = 0.03). In contrast, there was no significant difference in patients with BMI ≥22 as a function of VFA (P = 0.47). When the cohort was limited to patients with BMI ≥22, multivariate analysis showed that sarcopenia was a significant independent risk factor for recurrence (hazard ratio = 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.5; P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Low-SMI was an independent adverse prognostic factor for CRR in patients with BMI ≥22. Therefore, preventing muscle wasting may improve the CRR of patients with HCC. SN - 1743-9159 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27154615/Adverse_impact_of_low_skeletal_muscle_index_on_the_prognosis_of_hepatocellular_carcinoma_after_hepatic_resection_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1743-9191(16)30080-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -