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The functional subdivision of the visual brain: Is there a real illusion effect on action? A multi-lab replication study.
Cortex. 2016 06; 79:130-52.C

Abstract

It has often been suggested that visual illusions affect perception but not actions such as grasping, as predicted by the "two-visual-systems" hypothesis of Milner and Goodale (1995, The Visual Brain in Action, Oxford University press). However, at least for the Ebbinghaus illusion, relevant studies seem to reveal a consistent illusion effect on grasping (Franz & Gegenfurtner, 2008. Grasping visual illusions: consistent data and no dissociation. Cognitive Neuropsychology). Two interpretations are possible: either grasping is not immune to illusions (arguing against dissociable processing mechanisms for vision-for-perception and vision-for-action), or some other factors modulate grasping in ways that mimic a vision-for perception effect in actions. It has been suggested that one such factor may be obstacle avoidance (Haffenden Schiff & Goodale, 2001. The dissociation between perception and action in the Ebbinghaus illusion: nonillusory effects of pictorial cues on grasp. Current Biology, 11, 177-181). In four different labs (total N = 144), we conducted an exact replication of previous studies suggesting obstacle avoidance mechanisms, implementing conditions that tested grasping as well as multiple perceptual tasks. This replication was supplemented by additional conditions to obtain more conclusive results. Our results confirm that grasping is affected by the Ebbinghaus illusion and demonstrate that this effect cannot be explained by obstacle avoidance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Hamburg, Department of Psychology, Hamburg, Germany; Center for Neuroscience and Cognitive Systems@UniTn, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Rovereto, TN, Italy. Electronic address: karl.kopiske@iit.it.Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Università di Parma, Unità di Psicologia, Parma, Italy. Electronic address: nicola.bruno@unipr.it.University of Aberdeen, School of Psychology, Kings College, Old Aberdeen, United Kingdom. Electronic address: c.hesse@abdn.ac.uk.Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München, Department of ​Psychology, Munich, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.schenk@psy.lmu.de.University of Hamburg, Department of Psychology, Hamburg, Germany; University of Tübingen, Department of Computer Science, Experimental Cognitive Science, Tübingen, Germany. Electronic address: volker.franz@uni-tuebingen.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27156056

Citation

Kopiske, Karl K., et al. "The Functional Subdivision of the Visual Brain: Is There a Real Illusion Effect On Action? a Multi-lab Replication Study." Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior, vol. 79, 2016, pp. 130-52.
Kopiske KK, Bruno N, Hesse C, et al. The functional subdivision of the visual brain: Is there a real illusion effect on action? A multi-lab replication study. Cortex. 2016;79:130-52.
Kopiske, K. K., Bruno, N., Hesse, C., Schenk, T., & Franz, V. H. (2016). The functional subdivision of the visual brain: Is there a real illusion effect on action? A multi-lab replication study. Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior, 79, 130-52. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2016.03.020
Kopiske KK, et al. The Functional Subdivision of the Visual Brain: Is There a Real Illusion Effect On Action? a Multi-lab Replication Study. Cortex. 2016;79:130-52. PubMed PMID: 27156056.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The functional subdivision of the visual brain: Is there a real illusion effect on action? A multi-lab replication study. AU - Kopiske,Karl K, AU - Bruno,Nicola, AU - Hesse,Constanze, AU - Schenk,Thomas, AU - Franz,Volker H, Y1 - 2016/04/06/ PY - 2015/09/29/received PY - 2016/02/10/revised PY - 2016/03/14/accepted PY - 2016/5/9/entrez PY - 2016/5/9/pubmed PY - 2017/9/28/medline KW - Action perception KW - Grasping KW - Illusions KW - Manual size estimation KW - Visual processing SP - 130 EP - 52 JF - Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior JO - Cortex VL - 79 N2 - It has often been suggested that visual illusions affect perception but not actions such as grasping, as predicted by the "two-visual-systems" hypothesis of Milner and Goodale (1995, The Visual Brain in Action, Oxford University press). However, at least for the Ebbinghaus illusion, relevant studies seem to reveal a consistent illusion effect on grasping (Franz & Gegenfurtner, 2008. Grasping visual illusions: consistent data and no dissociation. Cognitive Neuropsychology). Two interpretations are possible: either grasping is not immune to illusions (arguing against dissociable processing mechanisms for vision-for-perception and vision-for-action), or some other factors modulate grasping in ways that mimic a vision-for perception effect in actions. It has been suggested that one such factor may be obstacle avoidance (Haffenden Schiff & Goodale, 2001. The dissociation between perception and action in the Ebbinghaus illusion: nonillusory effects of pictorial cues on grasp. Current Biology, 11, 177-181). In four different labs (total N = 144), we conducted an exact replication of previous studies suggesting obstacle avoidance mechanisms, implementing conditions that tested grasping as well as multiple perceptual tasks. This replication was supplemented by additional conditions to obtain more conclusive results. Our results confirm that grasping is affected by the Ebbinghaus illusion and demonstrate that this effect cannot be explained by obstacle avoidance. SN - 1973-8102 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27156056/The_functional_subdivision_of_the_visual_brain:_Is_there_a_real_illusion_effect_on_action_A_multi_lab_replication_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0010-9452(16)30058-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -