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Bidirectional Association between Diabetes and Gout: the Singapore Chinese Health Study.
Sci Rep. 2016 05 10; 6:25766.SR

Abstract

We aimed to prospectively investigate the bidirectional association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and gout. We analyzed follow-up data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, when self-reports of diagnosed diabetes and gout were enquired at follow-ups I and II. Individuals who participated in both follow-ups and were free of cardiovascular disease or cancer at follow-up I were included. For T2D to gout (analysis I), prevalent gout were further excluded (final n = 31,137). For gout to T2D (analysis II), prevalent diabetes were excluded (final n = 28,668). Cox regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs). In the analysis I, the RR of diabetes to incident gout (682 cases) was 0.77 (95% CI 0.60-0.97). In the analysis II, the RR of gout to incident diabetes (2223 cases) was 1.36 (1.12-1.63), but became insignificant after adjustment for hypertension and BMI (1.00; 0.83-1.21). The gout to diabetes association was modified by BMI (Pinteraction = 0.04) and hypertension (Pinteraction = 0.007), and it was marginally significant in adults with BMI<24 while significant among non-hypertensive participants, but not in their counterparts. In conclusion, our results suggest that diabetes is associated with a lower risk of incident gout, while gout is positively related to diabetes among normal weight and non-hypertensive adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore. University Medicine Cluster, Division of Rheumatology, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore.Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore. Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27161168

Citation

Pan, An, et al. "Bidirectional Association Between Diabetes and Gout: the Singapore Chinese Health Study." Scientific Reports, vol. 6, 2016, p. 25766.
Pan A, Teng GG, Yuan JM, et al. Bidirectional Association between Diabetes and Gout: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Sci Rep. 2016;6:25766.
Pan, A., Teng, G. G., Yuan, J. M., & Koh, W. P. (2016). Bidirectional Association between Diabetes and Gout: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Scientific Reports, 6, 25766. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep25766
Pan A, et al. Bidirectional Association Between Diabetes and Gout: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Sci Rep. 2016 05 10;6:25766. PubMed PMID: 27161168.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bidirectional Association between Diabetes and Gout: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. AU - Pan,An, AU - Teng,Gim Gee, AU - Yuan,Jian-Min, AU - Koh,Woon-Puay, Y1 - 2016/05/10/ PY - 2016/01/15/received PY - 2016/04/22/accepted PY - 2016/5/11/entrez PY - 2016/5/11/pubmed PY - 2018/3/27/medline SP - 25766 EP - 25766 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 6 N2 - We aimed to prospectively investigate the bidirectional association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and gout. We analyzed follow-up data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, when self-reports of diagnosed diabetes and gout were enquired at follow-ups I and II. Individuals who participated in both follow-ups and were free of cardiovascular disease or cancer at follow-up I were included. For T2D to gout (analysis I), prevalent gout were further excluded (final n = 31,137). For gout to T2D (analysis II), prevalent diabetes were excluded (final n = 28,668). Cox regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs). In the analysis I, the RR of diabetes to incident gout (682 cases) was 0.77 (95% CI 0.60-0.97). In the analysis II, the RR of gout to incident diabetes (2223 cases) was 1.36 (1.12-1.63), but became insignificant after adjustment for hypertension and BMI (1.00; 0.83-1.21). The gout to diabetes association was modified by BMI (Pinteraction = 0.04) and hypertension (Pinteraction = 0.007), and it was marginally significant in adults with BMI<24 while significant among non-hypertensive participants, but not in their counterparts. In conclusion, our results suggest that diabetes is associated with a lower risk of incident gout, while gout is positively related to diabetes among normal weight and non-hypertensive adults. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27161168/Bidirectional_Association_between_Diabetes_and_Gout:_the_Singapore_Chinese_Health_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/srep25766 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -