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The effect of alcohol hangover on choice response time.
J Psychopharmacol 2016; 30(7):654-61JP

Abstract

The effect of alcohol hangover on cognitive processing has received little attention. We explored the effect of alcohol hangover on choice response time (RT), a dominant dependent variable (DV) in cognitive research. Prior research of the effect of hangover on RT has produced mixed findings; all studies reviewed relied exclusively on estimates of central tendency (e.g. mean RT), which has limited information value. Here we present novel analytical methods by going beyond mean RT analysis. Specifically, we examined performance in hangover conditions (n=31) across the whole RT distribution by fitting ex-Gaussian models to participant data, providing a formal description of the RT distribution. This analysis showed detriments to performance under hangover conditions at the slower end of the RT distribution and increased RT variance under hangover conditions. We also fitted an explicit mathematical process model of choice RT - the diffusion model - which estimates parameters reflecting psychologically-meaningful processes underlying choice RT. This analysis showed that hangover reduced information processing efficiency during response selection, and increased response caution; changes in these parameters reflect hangover affecting core decisional-components of RT performance. The implications of the data as well as the methods used for hangover research are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Keele University, Keele, UK j.a.grange@keele.ac.uk.Keele University, Keele, UK.Health and Safety Laboratory, Buxton, UK.Sheffield University, Sheffield, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27166364

Citation

Grange, James A., et al. "The Effect of Alcohol Hangover On Choice Response Time." Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), vol. 30, no. 7, 2016, pp. 654-61.
Grange JA, Stephens R, Jones K, et al. The effect of alcohol hangover on choice response time. J Psychopharmacol (Oxford). 2016;30(7):654-61.
Grange, J. A., Stephens, R., Jones, K., & Owen, L. (2016). The effect of alcohol hangover on choice response time. Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), 30(7), pp. 654-61. doi:10.1177/0269881116645299.
Grange JA, et al. The Effect of Alcohol Hangover On Choice Response Time. J Psychopharmacol (Oxford). 2016;30(7):654-61. PubMed PMID: 27166364.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of alcohol hangover on choice response time. AU - Grange,James A, AU - Stephens,Richard, AU - Jones,Kate, AU - Owen,Lauren, Y1 - 2016/05/10/ PY - 2016/5/12/entrez PY - 2016/5/12/pubmed PY - 2017/12/28/medline KW - Alcohol hangover KW - choice response time KW - cognitive effects KW - diffusion model KW - ex-Gaussian analysis SP - 654 EP - 61 JF - Journal of psychopharmacology (Oxford, England) JO - J. Psychopharmacol. (Oxford) VL - 30 IS - 7 N2 - The effect of alcohol hangover on cognitive processing has received little attention. We explored the effect of alcohol hangover on choice response time (RT), a dominant dependent variable (DV) in cognitive research. Prior research of the effect of hangover on RT has produced mixed findings; all studies reviewed relied exclusively on estimates of central tendency (e.g. mean RT), which has limited information value. Here we present novel analytical methods by going beyond mean RT analysis. Specifically, we examined performance in hangover conditions (n=31) across the whole RT distribution by fitting ex-Gaussian models to participant data, providing a formal description of the RT distribution. This analysis showed detriments to performance under hangover conditions at the slower end of the RT distribution and increased RT variance under hangover conditions. We also fitted an explicit mathematical process model of choice RT - the diffusion model - which estimates parameters reflecting psychologically-meaningful processes underlying choice RT. This analysis showed that hangover reduced information processing efficiency during response selection, and increased response caution; changes in these parameters reflect hangover affecting core decisional-components of RT performance. The implications of the data as well as the methods used for hangover research are discussed. SN - 1461-7285 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27166364/The_effect_of_alcohol_hangover_on_choice_response_time_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269881116645299?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -