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Sex differences in the association of physical function and cognitive function with life satisfaction in older age: The Rancho Bernardo Study.
Maturitas. 2016 Jul; 89:29-35.M

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study examines the cross-sectional associations of cognitive and physical function with life satisfaction in middle-class, community-dwelling adults aged 60 and older.

STUDY DESIGN

Participants were 632 women and 410 men who had cognitive function tests (CFT) and physical function tasks (PFT) assessed at a clinic visit between 1988 and 1992, and who responded in 1992 to a mailed survey that included life satisfaction measures. Cognitive impairment was defined as ≤24 on MMSE, ≥132 on Trails B, ≤12 on Category Fluency, ≤13 on Buschke long-term recall, and ≤7 on Heaton immediate recall. Physical impairment was defined as participants' self-reported difficulty (yes/no) in performing 10 physical functions. Multiple linear regression examined associations between life satisfaction and impairment on ≥1 CFT or difficulty with ≥1 PFT.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS; range:0-26) and Life Satisfaction Index-Z (LSI-Z; range:5-35).

RESULTS

Participants' average age was 73.4 years (range=60-94). Categorically defined cognitive impairment was present in 40% of men and 47% of women. Additionally, 30% of men and 43% of women reported difficulty performing any PFT. Adjusting for age and impairment on ≥1 CFT, difficulty performing ≥1 PFT was associated with lower LSI-Z and SWLS scores in men (β=-1.73, -1.26, respectively, p<0.05) and women (β=-1.79, -1.93, respectively, p<0.01). However, impairment on ≥ 1 CFT was not associated with LSI-Z or SWLS score after adjusting for age and difficulty with ≥1 PFT.

CONCLUSIONS

Limited cognitive function was more common than limited physical function; however, limited physical function was more predictive of lower life satisfaction. Interventions to increase or maintain mobility among older adults may improve overall life satisfaction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA; Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Dr. San Diego, CA, 92182, USA.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. Electronic address: dsilverstein@ucsd.edu.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27180157

Citation

Ratigan, Amanda, et al. "Sex Differences in the Association of Physical Function and Cognitive Function With Life Satisfaction in Older Age: the Rancho Bernardo Study." Maturitas, vol. 89, 2016, pp. 29-35.
Ratigan A, Kritz-Silverstein D, Barrett-Connor E. Sex differences in the association of physical function and cognitive function with life satisfaction in older age: The Rancho Bernardo Study. Maturitas. 2016;89:29-35.
Ratigan, A., Kritz-Silverstein, D., & Barrett-Connor, E. (2016). Sex differences in the association of physical function and cognitive function with life satisfaction in older age: The Rancho Bernardo Study. Maturitas, 89, 29-35. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.04.007
Ratigan A, Kritz-Silverstein D, Barrett-Connor E. Sex Differences in the Association of Physical Function and Cognitive Function With Life Satisfaction in Older Age: the Rancho Bernardo Study. Maturitas. 2016;89:29-35. PubMed PMID: 27180157.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex differences in the association of physical function and cognitive function with life satisfaction in older age: The Rancho Bernardo Study. AU - Ratigan,Amanda, AU - Kritz-Silverstein,Donna, AU - Barrett-Connor,Elizabeth, Y1 - 2016/04/11/ PY - 2016/01/26/received PY - 2016/04/04/revised PY - 2016/04/08/accepted PY - 2016/5/16/entrez PY - 2016/5/18/pubmed PY - 2017/4/19/medline KW - Cognitive function KW - Life satisfaction KW - Physical function KW - Successful aging SP - 29 EP - 35 JF - Maturitas JO - Maturitas VL - 89 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study examines the cross-sectional associations of cognitive and physical function with life satisfaction in middle-class, community-dwelling adults aged 60 and older. STUDY DESIGN: Participants were 632 women and 410 men who had cognitive function tests (CFT) and physical function tasks (PFT) assessed at a clinic visit between 1988 and 1992, and who responded in 1992 to a mailed survey that included life satisfaction measures. Cognitive impairment was defined as ≤24 on MMSE, ≥132 on Trails B, ≤12 on Category Fluency, ≤13 on Buschke long-term recall, and ≤7 on Heaton immediate recall. Physical impairment was defined as participants' self-reported difficulty (yes/no) in performing 10 physical functions. Multiple linear regression examined associations between life satisfaction and impairment on ≥1 CFT or difficulty with ≥1 PFT. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS; range:0-26) and Life Satisfaction Index-Z (LSI-Z; range:5-35). RESULTS: Participants' average age was 73.4 years (range=60-94). Categorically defined cognitive impairment was present in 40% of men and 47% of women. Additionally, 30% of men and 43% of women reported difficulty performing any PFT. Adjusting for age and impairment on ≥1 CFT, difficulty performing ≥1 PFT was associated with lower LSI-Z and SWLS scores in men (β=-1.73, -1.26, respectively, p<0.05) and women (β=-1.79, -1.93, respectively, p<0.01). However, impairment on ≥ 1 CFT was not associated with LSI-Z or SWLS score after adjusting for age and difficulty with ≥1 PFT. CONCLUSIONS: Limited cognitive function was more common than limited physical function; however, limited physical function was more predictive of lower life satisfaction. Interventions to increase or maintain mobility among older adults may improve overall life satisfaction. SN - 1873-4111 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27180157/Sex_differences_in_the_association_of_physical_function_and_cognitive_function_with_life_satisfaction_in_older_age:_The_Rancho_Bernardo_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-5122(16)30079-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -