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Beliefs about inhaled corticosteroids: Comparison of community pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and patients with asthma.
J Asthma. 2016 12; 53(10):1051-8.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To compare pharmacists' and pharmacy technicians' perceptions of patients' beliefs regarding inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) with those of patients and to compare the ICS beliefs of pharmacists and technicians with those of patients with asthma.

METHODS

1269 community pharmacies were approached to fill out an online questionnaire; 1952 patients were sent a questionnaire by post. Beliefs (i.e., necessity and concerns) regarding ICS were measured using (an adapted version of) the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ-specific). Pharmacists and technicians were instructed to fill out the BMQ for themselves, and to fill it out in the way they thought most of their patients would complete it.

RESULTS

136 pharmacists, 90 pharmacy technicians and 161 patients with asthma completed the questionnaire. Pharmacists and technicians thought patients had more concerns about ICS than patients themselves reported (p < 0.0001). They also thought that patients had stronger beliefs in their personal need for ICS than patients reported (p < 0.01). Pharmacists reported lower levels of concerns than patients (p < 0.05) and both providers attributed a higher level of necessity to ICS than patients did (p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION

Pharmacists and technicians overestimate the personal need for treatment as well as the concerns patients with asthma have regarding ICS. They also have, to some extent, stronger positive beliefs about ICS than patients. If pharmacists and technicians expect that patients share their positive views about ICS, they might be less likely to elicit and address patients' doubts and concerns about ICS, which might be relevant for effective ICS treatment and subsequent patient outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a NIVEL, Netherlands institute for health services research , Utrecht , The Netherlands.b Department of Clinical Pharmacy , Radboud University Medical Center , Nijmegen , The Netherlands. c IQ Healthcare, Radboud University Medical Center , Nijmegen , The Netherlands.d Division of Pharmacoepidemiology & Clinical Pharmacology , Utrecht University , Utrecht , The Netherlands. e Department of Pharmacotherapy and Pharmaceutical Care , University of Groningen , Groningen , The Netherlands.f Centre for Behavioral Medicine, Department of Practice and Policy , UCL School of Pharmacy , London , United Kingdom.a NIVEL, Netherlands institute for health services research , Utrecht , The Netherlands.b Department of Clinical Pharmacy , Radboud University Medical Center , Nijmegen , The Netherlands. g Department of Pharmacy , Sint Maartenskliniek , Nijmegen , The Netherlands.a NIVEL, Netherlands institute for health services research , Utrecht , The Netherlands. h Department of Primary and Community Care , Radboud University Medical Center , Nijmegen , The Netherlands. i Faculty of Health Sciences , Buskerud and Vestfold University College , Drammen , Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27187172

Citation

Driesenaar, Jeanine A., et al. "Beliefs About Inhaled Corticosteroids: Comparison of Community Pharmacists, Pharmacy Technicians and Patients With Asthma." The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, vol. 53, no. 10, 2016, pp. 1051-8.
Driesenaar JA, De Smet PA, van Hulten R, et al. Beliefs about inhaled corticosteroids: Comparison of community pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and patients with asthma. J Asthma. 2016;53(10):1051-8.
Driesenaar, J. A., De Smet, P. A., van Hulten, R., Horne, R., Zwikker, H., van den Bemt, B., & van Dulmen, S. (2016). Beliefs about inhaled corticosteroids: Comparison of community pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and patients with asthma. The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, 53(10), 1051-8. https://doi.org/10.1080/02770903.2016.1180696
Driesenaar JA, et al. Beliefs About Inhaled Corticosteroids: Comparison of Community Pharmacists, Pharmacy Technicians and Patients With Asthma. J Asthma. 2016;53(10):1051-8. PubMed PMID: 27187172.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beliefs about inhaled corticosteroids: Comparison of community pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and patients with asthma. AU - Driesenaar,Jeanine A, AU - De Smet,Peter A G M, AU - van Hulten,Rolf, AU - Horne,Rob, AU - Zwikker,Hanneke, AU - van den Bemt,Bart, AU - van Dulmen,Sandra, Y1 - 2016/05/17/ PY - 2016/5/18/entrez PY - 2016/5/18/pubmed PY - 2017/6/7/medline KW - Beliefs about medicines KW - adherence KW - patient-centered communication KW - patient-pharmacist communication KW - perceptions of patients' beliefs SP - 1051 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma JO - J Asthma VL - 53 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To compare pharmacists' and pharmacy technicians' perceptions of patients' beliefs regarding inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) with those of patients and to compare the ICS beliefs of pharmacists and technicians with those of patients with asthma. METHODS: 1269 community pharmacies were approached to fill out an online questionnaire; 1952 patients were sent a questionnaire by post. Beliefs (i.e., necessity and concerns) regarding ICS were measured using (an adapted version of) the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ-specific). Pharmacists and technicians were instructed to fill out the BMQ for themselves, and to fill it out in the way they thought most of their patients would complete it. RESULTS: 136 pharmacists, 90 pharmacy technicians and 161 patients with asthma completed the questionnaire. Pharmacists and technicians thought patients had more concerns about ICS than patients themselves reported (p < 0.0001). They also thought that patients had stronger beliefs in their personal need for ICS than patients reported (p < 0.01). Pharmacists reported lower levels of concerns than patients (p < 0.05) and both providers attributed a higher level of necessity to ICS than patients did (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Pharmacists and technicians overestimate the personal need for treatment as well as the concerns patients with asthma have regarding ICS. They also have, to some extent, stronger positive beliefs about ICS than patients. If pharmacists and technicians expect that patients share their positive views about ICS, they might be less likely to elicit and address patients' doubts and concerns about ICS, which might be relevant for effective ICS treatment and subsequent patient outcomes. SN - 1532-4303 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27187172/Beliefs_about_inhaled_corticosteroids:_Comparison_of_community_pharmacists_pharmacy_technicians_and_patients_with_asthma_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02770903.2016.1180696 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -