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Do dental students have a neutral working posture?
J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2016 Nov 21; 29(4):859-864.JB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dentists are susceptible to Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) due to prolonged static postures. To prevent MSDs, working postures of dental students should be assessed and corrected in early career life.

OBJECTIVE

This study estimated the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders in dental students using Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) tool.

METHODS

A number of 103 undergraduate dental students from fourth and fifth academic years participated. Postures of these students were assessed using RULA tool while working in the dental clinic. They also answered a questionnaire regarding their knowledge about postural dental ergonomic principles.

RESULTS

The majority of the students (66%) were at intermediate and high risk levels to develop MSDs and their postures needed to be corrected. There was no significant correlation between RULA score and gender, academic year and different wards of dental clinics. There was no significant correlation between knowledge and RULA scores.

CONCLUSIONS

Dental students did not have favorable working postures. They were at an intermediate to high risk for developing MSDs which calls for a change in their working postures. Therefore students should be trained with ergonomic principles and to achieve the best results, ergonomic lessons should be accompanied by practice and periodical evaluations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dental Materials Research Center, Department of Community Oral Health, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.Dental Research Center, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.Department of Occupational Health Engineering, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran.Department of Periodontics, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, LA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27197705

Citation

Movahhed, Taraneh, et al. "Do Dental Students Have a Neutral Working Posture?" Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, vol. 29, no. 4, 2016, pp. 859-864.
Movahhed T, Dehghani M, Arghami S, et al. Do dental students have a neutral working posture? J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2016;29(4):859-864.
Movahhed, T., Dehghani, M., Arghami, S., & Arghami, A. (2016). Do dental students have a neutral working posture? Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, 29(4), 859-864.
Movahhed T, et al. Do Dental Students Have a Neutral Working Posture. J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2016 Nov 21;29(4):859-864. PubMed PMID: 27197705.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do dental students have a neutral working posture? AU - Movahhed,Taraneh, AU - Dehghani,Mahboobe, AU - Arghami,Shirazeh, AU - Arghami,Afarin, PY - 2016/5/21/pubmed PY - 2017/2/6/medline PY - 2016/5/21/entrez KW - Dentistry KW - RULA KW - ergonomics KW - musculoskeletal disorders KW - posture SP - 859 EP - 864 JF - Journal of back and musculoskeletal rehabilitation JO - J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil VL - 29 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dentists are susceptible to Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) due to prolonged static postures. To prevent MSDs, working postures of dental students should be assessed and corrected in early career life. OBJECTIVE: This study estimated the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders in dental students using Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) tool. METHODS: A number of 103 undergraduate dental students from fourth and fifth academic years participated. Postures of these students were assessed using RULA tool while working in the dental clinic. They also answered a questionnaire regarding their knowledge about postural dental ergonomic principles. RESULTS: The majority of the students (66%) were at intermediate and high risk levels to develop MSDs and their postures needed to be corrected. There was no significant correlation between RULA score and gender, academic year and different wards of dental clinics. There was no significant correlation between knowledge and RULA scores. CONCLUSIONS: Dental students did not have favorable working postures. They were at an intermediate to high risk for developing MSDs which calls for a change in their working postures. Therefore students should be trained with ergonomic principles and to achieve the best results, ergonomic lessons should be accompanied by practice and periodical evaluations. SN - 1878-6324 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27197705/Do_dental_students_have_a_neutral_working_posture DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -