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Contribution of working conditions to occupational inequalities in depressive symptoms: results from the national French SUMER survey.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2016; 89(6):1025-37IA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Social inequalities in mental health have been observed, but explanations are still lacking. The objectives were to evaluate the contribution of a large set of psychosocial work factors and other occupational exposures to social inequalities in mental health in a national representative sample of employees.

METHODS

The sample from the cross-sectional national French survey SUMER 2010 included 46,962 employees: 26,883 men and 20,079 women. Anxiety and depression symptoms were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. Occupation was used as a marker of social position. Psychosocial work factors included various variables related to the classical job strain model, psychological demands, decision latitude, social support, and other understudied variables related to reward, job insecurity, job promotion, esteem, working time/hours, and workplace violence. Other occupational exposures of chemical, biological, physical, and biomechanical nature were also studied. Weighted age-adjusted linear regression analyses were performed.

RESULTS

Occupational gradients were found in the exposure to most psychosocial work factors and other occupational exposures. Occupational inequalities were observed for depressive symptoms, but not for anxiety symptoms. The factors related to decision latitude (and its sub-dimensions, skill discretion, and decision authority), social support, and reward (and its sub-dimensions, job promotion, job insecurity, and esteem) contributed to explain occupational inequalities in depressive symptoms. Decision latitude played a major role in the explanation. Workplace violence variables contributed among men only. Other exposures of physical and biomechanical nature also displayed significant contributions.

CONCLUSIONS

Comprehensive prevention policies at the workplace may help to reduce social inequalities in mental health in the working population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social Epidemiology, Pierre Louis Institute of Epidemiology and Public Health, INSERM, UMR_S 1136, 75013, Paris, France. isabelle.niedhammer@inserm.fr. Department of Social Epidemiology, Pierre Louis Institute of Epidemiology and Public Health, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR_S 1136, 75013, Paris, France. isabelle.niedhammer@inserm.fr. Faculté de Médecine Pierre et Marie Curie - pôle Saint-Antoine, INSERM UMRS 1136, IPLESP, Team 7 (ERES), 27 rue de Chaligny, 75012, Paris, France. isabelle.niedhammer@inserm.fr.Department of Social Epidemiology, Pierre Louis Institute of Epidemiology and Public Health, INSERM, UMR_S 1136, 75013, Paris, France. Department of Social Epidemiology, Pierre Louis Institute of Epidemiology and Public Health, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR_S 1136, 75013, Paris, France.Ministry of Labour, DARES, Paris, France.Department of Social Epidemiology, Pierre Louis Institute of Epidemiology and Public Health, INSERM, UMR_S 1136, 75013, Paris, France. Department of Social Epidemiology, Pierre Louis Institute of Epidemiology and Public Health, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR_S 1136, 75013, Paris, France.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27197816

Citation

Niedhammer, Isabelle, et al. "Contribution of Working Conditions to Occupational Inequalities in Depressive Symptoms: Results From the National French SUMER Survey." International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, vol. 89, no. 6, 2016, pp. 1025-37.
Niedhammer I, Lesuffleur T, Coutrot T, et al. Contribution of working conditions to occupational inequalities in depressive symptoms: results from the national French SUMER survey. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016;89(6):1025-37.
Niedhammer, I., Lesuffleur, T., Coutrot, T., & Chastang, J. F. (2016). Contribution of working conditions to occupational inequalities in depressive symptoms: results from the national French SUMER survey. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 89(6), pp. 1025-37. doi:10.1007/s00420-016-1142-6.
Niedhammer I, et al. Contribution of Working Conditions to Occupational Inequalities in Depressive Symptoms: Results From the National French SUMER Survey. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016;89(6):1025-37. PubMed PMID: 27197816.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contribution of working conditions to occupational inequalities in depressive symptoms: results from the national French SUMER survey. AU - Niedhammer,Isabelle, AU - Lesuffleur,Thomas, AU - Coutrot,Thomas, AU - Chastang,Jean-François, Y1 - 2016/05/19/ PY - 2016/01/26/received PY - 2016/05/04/accepted PY - 2016/5/21/entrez PY - 2016/5/21/pubmed PY - 2017/7/15/medline KW - Depressive symptoms KW - Mental health KW - Occupational exposures KW - Psychosocial work factors KW - Social inequalities in health KW - Working conditions SP - 1025 EP - 37 JF - International archives of occupational and environmental health JO - Int Arch Occup Environ Health VL - 89 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Social inequalities in mental health have been observed, but explanations are still lacking. The objectives were to evaluate the contribution of a large set of psychosocial work factors and other occupational exposures to social inequalities in mental health in a national representative sample of employees. METHODS: The sample from the cross-sectional national French survey SUMER 2010 included 46,962 employees: 26,883 men and 20,079 women. Anxiety and depression symptoms were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. Occupation was used as a marker of social position. Psychosocial work factors included various variables related to the classical job strain model, psychological demands, decision latitude, social support, and other understudied variables related to reward, job insecurity, job promotion, esteem, working time/hours, and workplace violence. Other occupational exposures of chemical, biological, physical, and biomechanical nature were also studied. Weighted age-adjusted linear regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: Occupational gradients were found in the exposure to most psychosocial work factors and other occupational exposures. Occupational inequalities were observed for depressive symptoms, but not for anxiety symptoms. The factors related to decision latitude (and its sub-dimensions, skill discretion, and decision authority), social support, and reward (and its sub-dimensions, job promotion, job insecurity, and esteem) contributed to explain occupational inequalities in depressive symptoms. Decision latitude played a major role in the explanation. Workplace violence variables contributed among men only. Other exposures of physical and biomechanical nature also displayed significant contributions. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive prevention policies at the workplace may help to reduce social inequalities in mental health in the working population. SN - 1432-1246 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27197816/Contribution_of_working_conditions_to_occupational_inequalities_in_depressive_symptoms:_results_from_the_national_French_SUMER_survey_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00420-016-1142-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -