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The bioaccessibility of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) in cooked plant and animal origin foods.
Environ Int. 2016 Sep; 94:33-42.EI

Abstract

In this study, we compared the effect of boiling and frying food preparation methods in determining the bioaccessibility of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) in rice, cabbage, milk powder, eggs, beef, and fresh water fish. We then used these data to calculate a toxic equivalent (TEQ) for risk assessment and compared it to published values that did not account for bioaccessibility. When the foods were prepared by boiling, the mean bioaccessibility (%) in rice (PCBs: 16.5±1.0, PCDD/Fs: 4.9±0.3) and cabbage (PCBs: 4.2±0.9, PCDD/Fs: 1.9±0.7) were lower than in animal origin foods (beef, PCBs: 49.0±3.3, PCDD/Fs: 7.8±0.9; egg, PCBs: 29.7±3.1, PCDD/Fs: 8.6±1.3; fish, PCBs: 26.9±2.5, PCDD/Fs: 7.9±1.3; milk powder, PCBs: 72.3±1.6, PCDD/Fs: 28.4±1.2). When fried in cooking oil, the bioaccessibilities of all analytes in all foods increased, but the increase in plant based foods (rice, PCBs: 3.4×, PCDD/Fs: 3.6×; cabbage, PCBs: 10.3×, PCDD/Fs: 7.9×) was greater than that of animal origin foods (beef, PCBs: 1.6×, PCDD/Fs: 3.4×; egg, PCBs: 2.1×, PCDD/Fs: 1.8×; fish, PCBs: 2.8, PCDD/Fs: 3.2×). Comparison of PCBs/PCDD/Fs bioaccessibility in rice and cabbage showed that bioaccessibility was greater in the low fat, high carbohydrate/protein content food (rice) than in the low carbohydrate/protein, low fat content food (cabbage), regardless of the method used to prepare the food. Adjusting for bioaccessibility reduced the gross estimated daily intake (EDI) of 112pgWHO-TEQ/day, by 88% and 63% respectively for foods prepared by boiling and frying. Our results indicate that: 1) The method used for cooking is an important determinant of PCBs/PCDD/Fs bioaccessibility, especially for plant origin foods, 2) there might be a joint fat, carbohydrate and protein effect that influences the bioaccessibilities of PCBs/PCDD/Fs in foods, and 3) use of bioaccessibility estimates would reduce the uncertainty in TEQ calculations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 3399 Binsheng Road, 310051 Hangzhou, China. Electronic address: oldfishmann@hotmail.com.U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA.Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 3399 Binsheng Road, 310051 Hangzhou, China.China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, 7 Panjiayuan Nanli Road, 100021 Beijing, China.Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 1380 Zhongshan West Road, Shanghai 200336, China.Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Biometrology and Inspection and Quarantine, China Jiliang University, 310018 Hangzhou,China.Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 3399 Binsheng Road, 310051 Hangzhou, China.Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 3399 Binsheng Road, 310051 Hangzhou, China.China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, 7 Panjiayuan Nanli Road, 100021 Beijing, China.U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA.Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 3399 Binsheng Road, 310051 Hangzhou, China.China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, 7 Panjiayuan Nanli Road, 100021 Beijing, China. Electronic address: wuyongning@cfsa.net.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27203782

Citation

Shen, Haitao, et al. "The Bioaccessibility of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) and Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) in Cooked Plant and Animal Origin Foods." Environment International, vol. 94, 2016, pp. 33-42.
Shen H, Starr J, Han J, et al. The bioaccessibility of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) in cooked plant and animal origin foods. Environ Int. 2016;94:33-42.
Shen, H., Starr, J., Han, J., Zhang, L., Lu, D., Guan, R., Xu, X., Wang, X., Li, J., Li, W., Zhang, Y., & Wu, Y. (2016). The bioaccessibility of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) in cooked plant and animal origin foods. Environment International, 94, 33-42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2016.05.003
Shen H, et al. The Bioaccessibility of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) and Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) in Cooked Plant and Animal Origin Foods. Environ Int. 2016;94:33-42. PubMed PMID: 27203782.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The bioaccessibility of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) in cooked plant and animal origin foods. AU - Shen,Haitao, AU - Starr,James, AU - Han,Jianlong, AU - Zhang,Lei, AU - Lu,Dasheng, AU - Guan,Rongfa, AU - Xu,Xiaomin, AU - Wang,Xiaofeng, AU - Li,Jingguang, AU - Li,Weiwei, AU - Zhang,Yanjun, AU - Wu,Yongning, Y1 - 2016/05/18/ PY - 2016/04/12/received PY - 2016/05/04/revised PY - 2016/05/04/accepted PY - 2016/5/21/entrez PY - 2016/5/21/pubmed PY - 2018/1/23/medline KW - Bioaccessibility KW - Cooked foods KW - Dietary exposure assessment KW - In vitro assay KW - PCBs KW - PCDD/Fs SP - 33 EP - 42 JF - Environment international JO - Environ Int VL - 94 N2 - In this study, we compared the effect of boiling and frying food preparation methods in determining the bioaccessibility of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) in rice, cabbage, milk powder, eggs, beef, and fresh water fish. We then used these data to calculate a toxic equivalent (TEQ) for risk assessment and compared it to published values that did not account for bioaccessibility. When the foods were prepared by boiling, the mean bioaccessibility (%) in rice (PCBs: 16.5±1.0, PCDD/Fs: 4.9±0.3) and cabbage (PCBs: 4.2±0.9, PCDD/Fs: 1.9±0.7) were lower than in animal origin foods (beef, PCBs: 49.0±3.3, PCDD/Fs: 7.8±0.9; egg, PCBs: 29.7±3.1, PCDD/Fs: 8.6±1.3; fish, PCBs: 26.9±2.5, PCDD/Fs: 7.9±1.3; milk powder, PCBs: 72.3±1.6, PCDD/Fs: 28.4±1.2). When fried in cooking oil, the bioaccessibilities of all analytes in all foods increased, but the increase in plant based foods (rice, PCBs: 3.4×, PCDD/Fs: 3.6×; cabbage, PCBs: 10.3×, PCDD/Fs: 7.9×) was greater than that of animal origin foods (beef, PCBs: 1.6×, PCDD/Fs: 3.4×; egg, PCBs: 2.1×, PCDD/Fs: 1.8×; fish, PCBs: 2.8, PCDD/Fs: 3.2×). Comparison of PCBs/PCDD/Fs bioaccessibility in rice and cabbage showed that bioaccessibility was greater in the low fat, high carbohydrate/protein content food (rice) than in the low carbohydrate/protein, low fat content food (cabbage), regardless of the method used to prepare the food. Adjusting for bioaccessibility reduced the gross estimated daily intake (EDI) of 112pgWHO-TEQ/day, by 88% and 63% respectively for foods prepared by boiling and frying. Our results indicate that: 1) The method used for cooking is an important determinant of PCBs/PCDD/Fs bioaccessibility, especially for plant origin foods, 2) there might be a joint fat, carbohydrate and protein effect that influences the bioaccessibilities of PCBs/PCDD/Fs in foods, and 3) use of bioaccessibility estimates would reduce the uncertainty in TEQ calculations. SN - 1873-6750 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27203782/The_bioaccessibility_of_polychlorinated_biphenyls__PCBs__and_polychlorinated_dibenzo_p_dioxins/furans__PCDD/Fs__in_cooked_plant_and_animal_origin_foods_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0160-4120(16)30175-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -