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Increased Risk of Burnout for Physicians and Nurses Involved in a Patient Safety Incident.
Med Care. 2016 10; 54(10):937-43.MC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Human errors occur everywhere, including in health care. Not only the patient, but also the involved health professional is affected (ie, the "second victim").

OBJECTIVES

To investigate the prevalence of health care professionals being personally involved in a patient safety incident (PSI), as well as the relationship of involvement and degree of harm with problematic medication use, excessive alcohol consumption, risk of burnout, work-home interference (WHI), and turnover intentions.

RESEARCH DESIGN

Multilevel path analyses were conducted to analyze cross-sectional survey data from 37 Belgian hospitals.

SUBJECTS

A total of 5788 nurses (79.4%) and physicians (20.6%) in 26 acute and 11 psychiatric hospitals were included.

MEASURES

"Involvement in a patient safety incident during the prior 6 months," "degree of harm," and 5 outcomes were measured using self-report scales.

RESULTS

Nine percent of the total sample had been involved in a PSI during the prior 6 months. Involvement in a PSI was related to a greater risk of burnout (β=0.40, OR=2.07), to problematic medication use (β=0.33, OR=1.84), to greater WHI (β=0.24), and to more turnover intentions (β=0.22). Harm to the patient was a predictor of problematic medication use (β=0.14, OR=1.56), risk of burnout (β=0.16, OR=1.62), and WHI (β=0.19).

CONCLUSIONS

Second victims experience significant negative outcomes in the aftermath of a PSI. An appropriate organizational response should be provided to mitigate the negative effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

*Leuven Institute for Healthcare Policy, KU Leuven, Leuven †Knowledge, Information and Research Center (KIR), Idewe, Brussels ‡Occupational & Organisational Psychology and Professional Learning §Environment and Health, KU Leuven, Leuven ∥Department of Family Medicine & Chronic Care, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Ixelles ¶Department of Sociology, Ghent University, Ghent #Optentia Research Focus Area, Vanderbijlpark, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa **General Management, University Hospitals Leuven & Flemish Hospital Network ††Department of Public Health & Primary Care, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27213542

Citation

Van Gerven, Eva, et al. "Increased Risk of Burnout for Physicians and Nurses Involved in a Patient Safety Incident." Medical Care, vol. 54, no. 10, 2016, pp. 937-43.
Van Gerven E, Vander Elst T, Vandenbroeck S, et al. Increased Risk of Burnout for Physicians and Nurses Involved in a Patient Safety Incident. Med Care. 2016;54(10):937-43.
Van Gerven, E., Vander Elst, T., Vandenbroeck, S., Dierickx, S., Euwema, M., Sermeus, W., De Witte, H., Godderis, L., & Vanhaecht, K. (2016). Increased Risk of Burnout for Physicians and Nurses Involved in a Patient Safety Incident. Medical Care, 54(10), 937-43. https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0000000000000582
Van Gerven E, et al. Increased Risk of Burnout for Physicians and Nurses Involved in a Patient Safety Incident. Med Care. 2016;54(10):937-43. PubMed PMID: 27213542.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased Risk of Burnout for Physicians and Nurses Involved in a Patient Safety Incident. AU - Van Gerven,Eva, AU - Vander Elst,Tinne, AU - Vandenbroeck,Sofie, AU - Dierickx,Sigrid, AU - Euwema,Martin, AU - Sermeus,Walter, AU - De Witte,Hans, AU - Godderis,Lode, AU - Vanhaecht,Kris, PY - 2016/5/24/entrez PY - 2016/5/24/pubmed PY - 2017/5/4/medline SP - 937 EP - 43 JF - Medical care JO - Med Care VL - 54 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Human errors occur everywhere, including in health care. Not only the patient, but also the involved health professional is affected (ie, the "second victim"). OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of health care professionals being personally involved in a patient safety incident (PSI), as well as the relationship of involvement and degree of harm with problematic medication use, excessive alcohol consumption, risk of burnout, work-home interference (WHI), and turnover intentions. RESEARCH DESIGN: Multilevel path analyses were conducted to analyze cross-sectional survey data from 37 Belgian hospitals. SUBJECTS: A total of 5788 nurses (79.4%) and physicians (20.6%) in 26 acute and 11 psychiatric hospitals were included. MEASURES: "Involvement in a patient safety incident during the prior 6 months," "degree of harm," and 5 outcomes were measured using self-report scales. RESULTS: Nine percent of the total sample had been involved in a PSI during the prior 6 months. Involvement in a PSI was related to a greater risk of burnout (β=0.40, OR=2.07), to problematic medication use (β=0.33, OR=1.84), to greater WHI (β=0.24), and to more turnover intentions (β=0.22). Harm to the patient was a predictor of problematic medication use (β=0.14, OR=1.56), risk of burnout (β=0.16, OR=1.62), and WHI (β=0.19). CONCLUSIONS: Second victims experience significant negative outcomes in the aftermath of a PSI. An appropriate organizational response should be provided to mitigate the negative effects. SN - 1537-1948 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27213542/Increased_Risk_of_Burnout_for_Physicians_and_Nurses_Involved_in_a_Patient_Safety_Incident_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0000000000000582 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -