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Profiles of Student Perceptions of School Climate: Relations with Risk Behaviors and Academic Outcomes.
Am J Community Psychol. 2016 06; 57(3-4):291-307.AJ

Abstract

School climate has been linked to a variety of positive student outcomes, but there may be important within-school differences among students in their experiences of school climate. This study examined within-school heterogeneity among 47,631 high school student ratings of their school climate through multilevel latent class modeling. Student profiles across 323 schools were generated on the basis of multiple indicators of school climate: disciplinary structure, academic expectations, student willingness to seek help, respect for students, affective and cognitive engagement, prevalence of teasing and bullying, general victimization, bullying victimization, and bullying perpetration. Analyses identified four meaningfully different student profile types that were labeled positive climate, medium climate-low bullying, medium climate-high bullying, and negative climate. Contrasts among these profile types on external criteria revealed meaningful differences for race, grade-level, parent education level, educational aspirations, and frequency of risk behaviors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. KDS5UN@Virginia.edu.Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27216025

Citation

Shukla, Kathan, et al. "Profiles of Student Perceptions of School Climate: Relations With Risk Behaviors and Academic Outcomes." American Journal of Community Psychology, vol. 57, no. 3-4, 2016, pp. 291-307.
Shukla K, Konold T, Cornell D. Profiles of Student Perceptions of School Climate: Relations with Risk Behaviors and Academic Outcomes. Am J Community Psychol. 2016;57(3-4):291-307.
Shukla, K., Konold, T., & Cornell, D. (2016). Profiles of Student Perceptions of School Climate: Relations with Risk Behaviors and Academic Outcomes. American Journal of Community Psychology, 57(3-4), 291-307. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajcp.12044
Shukla K, Konold T, Cornell D. Profiles of Student Perceptions of School Climate: Relations With Risk Behaviors and Academic Outcomes. Am J Community Psychol. 2016;57(3-4):291-307. PubMed PMID: 27216025.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Profiles of Student Perceptions of School Climate: Relations with Risk Behaviors and Academic Outcomes. AU - Shukla,Kathan, AU - Konold,Timothy, AU - Cornell,Dewey, Y1 - 2016/05/04/ PY - 2016/5/25/entrez PY - 2016/5/25/pubmed PY - 2017/10/24/medline KW - Academic outcomes KW - Adolescents KW - High school KW - Latent class modeling KW - Risk behaviors KW - School climate SP - 291 EP - 307 JF - American journal of community psychology JO - Am J Community Psychol VL - 57 IS - 3-4 N2 - School climate has been linked to a variety of positive student outcomes, but there may be important within-school differences among students in their experiences of school climate. This study examined within-school heterogeneity among 47,631 high school student ratings of their school climate through multilevel latent class modeling. Student profiles across 323 schools were generated on the basis of multiple indicators of school climate: disciplinary structure, academic expectations, student willingness to seek help, respect for students, affective and cognitive engagement, prevalence of teasing and bullying, general victimization, bullying victimization, and bullying perpetration. Analyses identified four meaningfully different student profile types that were labeled positive climate, medium climate-low bullying, medium climate-high bullying, and negative climate. Contrasts among these profile types on external criteria revealed meaningful differences for race, grade-level, parent education level, educational aspirations, and frequency of risk behaviors. SN - 1573-2770 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27216025/Profiles_of_Student_Perceptions_of_School_Climate:_Relations_with_Risk_Behaviors_and_Academic_Outcomes_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ajcp.12044 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -