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More than just dancing: experiences of people with Parkinson's disease in a therapeutic dance program.

Abstract

PURPOSE

To understand why individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) participate in a community-based therapeutic dance program and to explore its influence on perceived physical, social and emotional well-being of participants.

METHODS

A qualitative descriptive design was employed using one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Individuals with PD who participated in the Dancing with Parkinson's program were recruited from two locations. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, de-identified and then placed into NVivo 10 software for analysis. A content analysis approach was used with an inductive analysis method to generate a coding scheme. Group discussion facilitated development of overarching themes.

RESULTS

Ten participants' responses revealed that the dance program allows for self-improvement and regaining identity through disease self-management. Positive influences of socialization arose through the class, decreasing isolation and improving quality of life. Participants communicate through music and dance to enhance connection with others.

CONCLUSIONS

Dancing with Parkinson's classes allow for re-development of the social self, which can increase sense of enjoyment in life. Dance programs provide opportunities for social interaction, non-verbal communication and self-improvement, reestablishing self-identity and a sense of usefulness. This study provides unique insight into the experience of participating in a dance program from the perspective of individuals with PD. Implications for rehabilitation Dance is emerging as a strategy to address the physical and psychosocial effects of Parkinson's disease (PD), but little is known regarding participants' perceptions of community-based therapeutic dance programs for PD. This study found that Dancing with Parkinson's (DWP) facilitated an improvement in social participation, resulting in decreased isolation and improved quality of life. Participation in the DWP program can facilitate a positive change in perspective and attitude toward a PD diagnosis, thereby increasing feelings of self-efficacy and improving self-management of the disease. Participants of this study emphasized the multifaceted benefits of DWP, suggesting that it has great potential for addressing not only the physical challenges, but also the cognitive and emotional challenges associated with PD.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

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    a Department of Physical Therapy , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.

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    a Department of Physical Therapy , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.

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    a Department of Physical Therapy , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.

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    a Department of Physical Therapy , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.

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    a Department of Physical Therapy , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.

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    b York West Active Living Centre , Toronto , Canada.

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    c Department of Undergraduate Medical Education , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.

    a Department of Physical Therapy , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada.

    Source

    Disability and rehabilitation 39:11 2017 Jun pg 1073-1078

    MeSH

    Aged
    Dance Therapy
    Female
    Humans
    Interviews as Topic
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Parkinson Disease
    Self Care
    Social Participation

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27216230