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Infant exposure to Chinese famine increased the risk of hypertension in adulthood: results from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study.
BMC Public Health 2016; 16:435BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Early-life developmental adaptations in response to severe malnutrition may play a crucial role in susceptibility to hypertension. This study aimed to explore the associations between exposure to the Chinese famine (1959-1961) at fetal, infant and preschool stages during fetal life or childhood and the risk of hypertension in adulthood.

METHODS

We used the data of 1,966 adults born between 1956 and 1964 in selected families from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) national survey.

RESULTS

Prevalence of hypertension among adults in non-exposed, fetal-exposed, infant-exposed, and preschool-exposed cohorts was 18.9, 20.7, 28.7, and 23.4 %, respectively. In severely affected famine areas, only infant-exposed cohort had a significant increased risk of hypertension compared with non-exposed cohort (OR 2.12; 95 % CI 1.19, 3.79; P = 0.011), and the significance remained after adjusted gender, smoking, and drinking (OR 2.11; 95 % CI 1.18, 3.77; P = 0.012). After stratification by BMI and economic status, the risk of hypertension was higher for subjects with BMI ≥ 24 kg/m(2)(OR 2.09; 95 % CI 1.09, 4.01; P = 0.026) or high economic status(OR 2.26; 95 % CI 1.19, 4.31; P = 0.013) than those with BMI < 24 kg/m(2)(OR 1.65; 95 % CI 0.71, 3.83; P = 0.246) or low economic status (OR 2.18; 95 % CI 1.14, 4.18; P = 0.019) in infant-exposed cohort of severely affected famine areas. However, there was no consistent association observed in less severely affected area or other exposed cohorts in severely affected areas.

CONCLUSIONS

Infanthood exposed to famine might increase the risk of hypertension in adulthood, and a postnatal 'rich' nutrient environment further increased the risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100191, China.Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA.Institute of Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100191, China.Institute of Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100191, China. harveyzou2002@bjmu.edu.cn.Institute of Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, No 38 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100191, China. majunt@bjmu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27225778

Citation

Wang, Zhenghe, et al. "Infant Exposure to Chinese Famine Increased the Risk of Hypertension in Adulthood: Results From the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study." BMC Public Health, vol. 16, 2016, p. 435.
Wang Z, Li C, Yang Z, et al. Infant exposure to Chinese famine increased the risk of hypertension in adulthood: results from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. BMC Public Health. 2016;16:435.
Wang, Z., Li, C., Yang, Z., Zou, Z., & Ma, J. (2016). Infant exposure to Chinese famine increased the risk of hypertension in adulthood: results from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. BMC Public Health, 16, p. 435. doi:10.1186/s12889-016-3122-x.
Wang Z, et al. Infant Exposure to Chinese Famine Increased the Risk of Hypertension in Adulthood: Results From the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. BMC Public Health. 2016 05 25;16:435. PubMed PMID: 27225778.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Infant exposure to Chinese famine increased the risk of hypertension in adulthood: results from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. AU - Wang,Zhenghe, AU - Li,Changwei, AU - Yang,Zhongping, AU - Zou,Zhiyong, AU - Ma,Jun, Y1 - 2016/05/25/ PY - 2016/01/16/received PY - 2016/05/17/accepted PY - 2016/5/27/entrez PY - 2016/5/27/pubmed PY - 2017/8/24/medline KW - Developmental origin KW - Famine KW - Fetal Malnutrition KW - Hypertension KW - Obesity SP - 435 EP - 435 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 16 N2 - BACKGROUND: Early-life developmental adaptations in response to severe malnutrition may play a crucial role in susceptibility to hypertension. This study aimed to explore the associations between exposure to the Chinese famine (1959-1961) at fetal, infant and preschool stages during fetal life or childhood and the risk of hypertension in adulthood. METHODS: We used the data of 1,966 adults born between 1956 and 1964 in selected families from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) national survey. RESULTS: Prevalence of hypertension among adults in non-exposed, fetal-exposed, infant-exposed, and preschool-exposed cohorts was 18.9, 20.7, 28.7, and 23.4 %, respectively. In severely affected famine areas, only infant-exposed cohort had a significant increased risk of hypertension compared with non-exposed cohort (OR 2.12; 95 % CI 1.19, 3.79; P = 0.011), and the significance remained after adjusted gender, smoking, and drinking (OR 2.11; 95 % CI 1.18, 3.77; P = 0.012). After stratification by BMI and economic status, the risk of hypertension was higher for subjects with BMI ≥ 24 kg/m(2)(OR 2.09; 95 % CI 1.09, 4.01; P = 0.026) or high economic status(OR 2.26; 95 % CI 1.19, 4.31; P = 0.013) than those with BMI < 24 kg/m(2)(OR 1.65; 95 % CI 0.71, 3.83; P = 0.246) or low economic status (OR 2.18; 95 % CI 1.14, 4.18; P = 0.019) in infant-exposed cohort of severely affected famine areas. However, there was no consistent association observed in less severely affected area or other exposed cohorts in severely affected areas. CONCLUSIONS: Infanthood exposed to famine might increase the risk of hypertension in adulthood, and a postnatal 'rich' nutrient environment further increased the risk. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27225778/Infant_exposure_to_Chinese_famine_increased_the_risk_of_hypertension_in_adulthood:_results_from_the_China_Health_and_Retirement_Longitudinal_Study_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-016-3122-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -