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Solar photolysis versus TiO2-mediated solar photocatalysis: a kinetic study of the degradation of naproxen and diclofenac in various water matrices.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Sep; 23(17):17437-48.ES

Abstract

Given that drugs and their degradation products are likely to occur as concoctions in wastewater, the degradation of a mixture of two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diclofenac (DCF) and naproxen (NPX), was investigated by solar photolysis and titanium dioxide (TiO2)-mediated solar photocatalysis using an immersion-well photoreactor. An equimolar ratio (1:1) of both NSAIDs in distilled water, drinking water, and river water was subjected to solar degradation. Solar photolysis of the DCF and NPX mixture was competitive particularly in drinking water and river water, as both drugs have the ability to undergo photolysis. However, the addition of TiO2 in the mixture significantly enhanced the degradation rate of both APIs compared to solar photolysis alone. Mineralization, as measured by chemical oxygen demand (COD), was incomplete under all conditions investigated. TiO2-mediated solar photocatalytic degradation of DCF and NPX mixtures produced 15 identifiable degradants corresponding to degradation of the individual NSAIDs, while two degradation products with much higher molecular weight than the parent NSAIDs were identified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). This study showed that the solar light intensity and the water matrix appear to be the main factors influencing the overall performance of the solar photolysis and TiO2-mediated solar photocatalysis for degradation of DCF and NPX mixtures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Chemistry, College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia. kdevagi@unimas.my. Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Resource Science and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 94300, Kota Samarahan, Sarawak, Malaysia. kdevagi@unimas.my.Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), Biomolecular Analysis Facility, Townsville, QLD, 4810, Australia.Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia.Chemistry, College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia. michael.oelgemoeller@jcu.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27230148

Citation

Kanakaraju, Devagi, et al. "Solar Photolysis Versus TiO2-mediated Solar Photocatalysis: a Kinetic Study of the Degradation of Naproxen and Diclofenac in Various Water Matrices." Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, vol. 23, no. 17, 2016, pp. 17437-48.
Kanakaraju D, Motti CA, Glass BD, et al. Solar photolysis versus TiO2-mediated solar photocatalysis: a kinetic study of the degradation of naproxen and diclofenac in various water matrices. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016;23(17):17437-48.
Kanakaraju, D., Motti, C. A., Glass, B. D., & Oelgemöller, M. (2016). Solar photolysis versus TiO2-mediated solar photocatalysis: a kinetic study of the degradation of naproxen and diclofenac in various water matrices. Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, 23(17), 17437-48. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-016-6906-8
Kanakaraju D, et al. Solar Photolysis Versus TiO2-mediated Solar Photocatalysis: a Kinetic Study of the Degradation of Naproxen and Diclofenac in Various Water Matrices. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016;23(17):17437-48. PubMed PMID: 27230148.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Solar photolysis versus TiO2-mediated solar photocatalysis: a kinetic study of the degradation of naproxen and diclofenac in various water matrices. AU - Kanakaraju,Devagi, AU - Motti,Cherie A, AU - Glass,Beverley D, AU - Oelgemöller,Michael, Y1 - 2016/05/26/ PY - 2016/02/26/received PY - 2016/05/16/accepted PY - 2016/5/28/entrez PY - 2016/5/28/pubmed PY - 2017/3/30/medline KW - Active pharmaceutical ingredients KW - Degradation KW - Pharmaceuticals KW - Photocatalysis KW - Photolysis KW - Sunlight SP - 17437 EP - 48 JF - Environmental science and pollution research international JO - Environ Sci Pollut Res Int VL - 23 IS - 17 N2 - Given that drugs and their degradation products are likely to occur as concoctions in wastewater, the degradation of a mixture of two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diclofenac (DCF) and naproxen (NPX), was investigated by solar photolysis and titanium dioxide (TiO2)-mediated solar photocatalysis using an immersion-well photoreactor. An equimolar ratio (1:1) of both NSAIDs in distilled water, drinking water, and river water was subjected to solar degradation. Solar photolysis of the DCF and NPX mixture was competitive particularly in drinking water and river water, as both drugs have the ability to undergo photolysis. However, the addition of TiO2 in the mixture significantly enhanced the degradation rate of both APIs compared to solar photolysis alone. Mineralization, as measured by chemical oxygen demand (COD), was incomplete under all conditions investigated. TiO2-mediated solar photocatalytic degradation of DCF and NPX mixtures produced 15 identifiable degradants corresponding to degradation of the individual NSAIDs, while two degradation products with much higher molecular weight than the parent NSAIDs were identified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). This study showed that the solar light intensity and the water matrix appear to be the main factors influencing the overall performance of the solar photolysis and TiO2-mediated solar photocatalysis for degradation of DCF and NPX mixtures. SN - 1614-7499 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27230148/Solar_photolysis_versus_TiO2_mediated_solar_photocatalysis:_a_kinetic_study_of_the_degradation_of_naproxen_and_diclofenac_in_various_water_matrices_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-016-6906-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -