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The relationship between housing subsidies and supportive housing on neighborhood distress and housing satisfaction: does drug use make a difference?
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2016 05 27; 11(1):20.SA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Since the 1970s, the dominant model for U.S. federal housing policy has shifted from unit-based programs to tenant-based vouchers and certificates. Because housing vouchers allow recipients to move to apartments and neighborhoods of their choice, such programs were designed to improve the ability of poor families to move into neighborhoods with less concentrated poverty. However, little research has examined whether housing voucher recipients live in less distressed neighborhoods than those without housing vouchers. There is much reason to believe that drug users may not be able to access or keep federal housing subsidies due to difficulties drug users, many of whom may have criminal histories and poor credit records, may have in obtaining free market rental housing. In response to these difficulties, permanent supportive housing was designed for those who are chronically homeless with one or more disabling condition, including substance use disorders. Little research has examined whether residents of permanent supportive housing units live in more or less economically distressed neighborhoods compared to low-income renters.

METHODS

This paper uses survey data from 337 low-income residents of Hartford, CT and geospatial analysis to determine whether low-income residents who receive housing subsidies and supportive housing live in neighborhoods with less concentrated poverty than those who do not. We also examine the relationships between receiving housing subsidies or supportive housing and housing satisfaction. Finally, we look at the moderating effects of drug use and race on level of neighborhood distress and housing satisfaction.

RESULTS

Results show that low-income residents who receive housing subsidies or supportive housing were not more or less likely to live in neighborhoods with high levels of distress, although Black residents with housing subsidies lived in more distressed neighborhoods. Regarding housing satisfaction, those with housing subsidies perceived significantly more choice in where they were living while those in supportive housing perceived less choice. In addition, those with rental subsidies or supportive housing reported living closer to needed services, unless they also reported heavy drug use.

CONCLUSIONS

Housing subsidies and supportive housing have little impact on the level of neighborhood distress in which recipients live, but some effects on housing satisfaction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Center for AIDS Intervention Research, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. jdickson@mcw.edu.Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Center for AIDS Intervention Research, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.Global Health, Mercer University, Macon, GA, USA.Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Center for AIDS Intervention Research, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.Institute for Community Research, Hartford, CT, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27233496

Citation

Dickson-Gomez, Julia, et al. "The Relationship Between Housing Subsidies and Supportive Housing On Neighborhood Distress and Housing Satisfaction: Does Drug Use Make a Difference?" Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, vol. 11, no. 1, 2016, p. 20.
Dickson-Gomez J, McAuliffe T, Obidoa C, et al. The relationship between housing subsidies and supportive housing on neighborhood distress and housing satisfaction: does drug use make a difference? Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2016;11(1):20.
Dickson-Gomez, J., McAuliffe, T., Obidoa, C., Quinn, K., & Weeks, M. (2016). The relationship between housing subsidies and supportive housing on neighborhood distress and housing satisfaction: does drug use make a difference? Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, 11(1), 20. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13011-016-0064-3
Dickson-Gomez J, et al. The Relationship Between Housing Subsidies and Supportive Housing On Neighborhood Distress and Housing Satisfaction: Does Drug Use Make a Difference. Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2016 05 27;11(1):20. PubMed PMID: 27233496.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship between housing subsidies and supportive housing on neighborhood distress and housing satisfaction: does drug use make a difference? AU - Dickson-Gomez,Julia, AU - McAuliffe,Timothy, AU - Obidoa,Chinekwu, AU - Quinn,Katherine, AU - Weeks,Margaret, Y1 - 2016/05/27/ PY - 2015/09/24/received PY - 2016/05/12/accepted PY - 2016/5/29/entrez PY - 2016/5/29/pubmed PY - 2017/10/14/medline KW - Homelessness KW - Neighborhood distress KW - Subsidized housing KW - Substance use KW - Supportive housing SP - 20 EP - 20 JF - Substance abuse treatment, prevention, and policy JO - Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Since the 1970s, the dominant model for U.S. federal housing policy has shifted from unit-based programs to tenant-based vouchers and certificates. Because housing vouchers allow recipients to move to apartments and neighborhoods of their choice, such programs were designed to improve the ability of poor families to move into neighborhoods with less concentrated poverty. However, little research has examined whether housing voucher recipients live in less distressed neighborhoods than those without housing vouchers. There is much reason to believe that drug users may not be able to access or keep federal housing subsidies due to difficulties drug users, many of whom may have criminal histories and poor credit records, may have in obtaining free market rental housing. In response to these difficulties, permanent supportive housing was designed for those who are chronically homeless with one or more disabling condition, including substance use disorders. Little research has examined whether residents of permanent supportive housing units live in more or less economically distressed neighborhoods compared to low-income renters. METHODS: This paper uses survey data from 337 low-income residents of Hartford, CT and geospatial analysis to determine whether low-income residents who receive housing subsidies and supportive housing live in neighborhoods with less concentrated poverty than those who do not. We also examine the relationships between receiving housing subsidies or supportive housing and housing satisfaction. Finally, we look at the moderating effects of drug use and race on level of neighborhood distress and housing satisfaction. RESULTS: Results show that low-income residents who receive housing subsidies or supportive housing were not more or less likely to live in neighborhoods with high levels of distress, although Black residents with housing subsidies lived in more distressed neighborhoods. Regarding housing satisfaction, those with housing subsidies perceived significantly more choice in where they were living while those in supportive housing perceived less choice. In addition, those with rental subsidies or supportive housing reported living closer to needed services, unless they also reported heavy drug use. CONCLUSIONS: Housing subsidies and supportive housing have little impact on the level of neighborhood distress in which recipients live, but some effects on housing satisfaction. SN - 1747-597X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27233496/The_relationship_between_housing_subsidies_and_supportive_housing_on_neighborhood_distress_and_housing_satisfaction:_does_drug_use_make_a_difference L2 - https://substanceabusepolicy.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13011-016-0064-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -