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Impaired airway epithelial cell responses from children with asthma to rhinoviral infection.
Clin Exp Allergy 2016; 46(11):1441-1455CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The airway epithelium forms an effective immune and physical barrier that is essential for protecting the lung from potentially harmful inhaled stimuli including viruses. Human rhinovirus (HRV) infection is a known trigger of asthma exacerbations, although the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood.

OBJECTIVE

To explore the relationship between apoptotic, innate immune and inflammatory responses to HRV infection in airway epithelial cells (AECs) obtained from children with asthma and non-asthmatic controls. In addition, to test the hypothesis that aberrant repair of epithelium from asthmatics is further dysregulated by HRV infection.

METHODS

Airway epithelial brushings were obtained from 39 asthmatic and 36 non-asthmatic children. Primary cultures were established and exposed to HRV1b and HRV14. Virus receptor number, virus replication and progeny release were determined. Epithelial cell apoptosis, IFN-β production, inflammatory cytokine release and epithelial wound repair and proliferation were also measured.

RESULTS

Virus proliferation and release was greater in airway epithelial cells from asthmatics but this was not related to the number of virus receptors. In epithelial cells from asthmatic children, virus infection dampened apoptosis, reduced IFN-β production and increased inflammatory cytokine production. HRV1b infection also inhibited wound repair capacity of epithelial cells isolated from non-asthmatic children and exaggerated the defective repair response seen in epithelial cells from asthmatics. Addition of IFN-β restored apoptosis, suppressed virus replication and improved repair of airway epithelial cells from asthmatics but did not reduce inflammatory cytokine production.

CONCLUSIONS

Collectively, HRV infection delays repair and inhibits apoptotic processes in epithelial cells from non-asthmatic and asthmatic children. The delayed repair is further exaggerated in cells from asthmatic children and is only partially reversed by exogenous IFN-β.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA, Australia. Anthony.Kicic@telethonkids.org.au. School of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia. Anthony.Kicic@telethonkids.org.au. Telethon Kids Institute, Centre for Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia. Anthony.Kicic@telethonkids.org.au. Centre for Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia and Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Nedlands, WA, Australia. Anthony.Kicic@telethonkids.org.au.School of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, Centre for Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia.Department of Respiratory Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, Centre for Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia.Department of Respiratory Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, Centre for Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, Centre for Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, Centre for Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, Centre for Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, Centre for Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia.School of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia. Centre for Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia and Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Nedlands, WA, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, Centre for Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia.Centre of Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia.Centre of Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia.School of Medicine, Notre Dame University, Fremantle, WA, Australia.School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia. Priority Research Centre for Asthma and Respiratory Disease, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.Department of Respiratory Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA, Australia. School of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, Centre for Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia. Centre for Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia and Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Nedlands, WA, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27238549

Citation

Kicic, A, et al. "Impaired Airway Epithelial Cell Responses From Children With Asthma to Rhinoviral Infection." Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 46, no. 11, 2016, pp. 1441-1455.
Kicic A, Stevens PT, Sutanto EN, et al. Impaired airway epithelial cell responses from children with asthma to rhinoviral infection. Clin Exp Allergy. 2016;46(11):1441-1455.
Kicic, A., Stevens, P. T., Sutanto, E. N., Kicic-Starcevich, E., Ling, K. M., Looi, K., ... Stick, S. M. (2016). Impaired airway epithelial cell responses from children with asthma to rhinoviral infection. Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 46(11), pp. 1441-1455. doi:10.1111/cea.12767.
Kicic A, et al. Impaired Airway Epithelial Cell Responses From Children With Asthma to Rhinoviral Infection. Clin Exp Allergy. 2016;46(11):1441-1455. PubMed PMID: 27238549.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impaired airway epithelial cell responses from children with asthma to rhinoviral infection. AU - Kicic,A, AU - Stevens,P T, AU - Sutanto,E N, AU - Kicic-Starcevich,E, AU - Ling,K-M, AU - Looi,K, AU - Martinovich,K M, AU - Garratt,L W, AU - Iosifidis,T, AU - Shaw,N C, AU - Buckley,A G, AU - Rigby,P J, AU - Lannigan,F J, AU - Knight,D A, AU - Stick,S M, Y1 - 2016/07/01/ PY - 2015/08/08/received PY - 2016/05/21/revised PY - 2016/05/25/accepted PY - 2016/10/30/pubmed PY - 2017/12/23/medline PY - 2016/5/31/entrez KW - airway epithelium KW - asthma KW - human rhinovirus KW - wound repair SP - 1441 EP - 1455 JF - Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology JO - Clin. Exp. Allergy VL - 46 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: The airway epithelium forms an effective immune and physical barrier that is essential for protecting the lung from potentially harmful inhaled stimuli including viruses. Human rhinovirus (HRV) infection is a known trigger of asthma exacerbations, although the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship between apoptotic, innate immune and inflammatory responses to HRV infection in airway epithelial cells (AECs) obtained from children with asthma and non-asthmatic controls. In addition, to test the hypothesis that aberrant repair of epithelium from asthmatics is further dysregulated by HRV infection. METHODS: Airway epithelial brushings were obtained from 39 asthmatic and 36 non-asthmatic children. Primary cultures were established and exposed to HRV1b and HRV14. Virus receptor number, virus replication and progeny release were determined. Epithelial cell apoptosis, IFN-β production, inflammatory cytokine release and epithelial wound repair and proliferation were also measured. RESULTS: Virus proliferation and release was greater in airway epithelial cells from asthmatics but this was not related to the number of virus receptors. In epithelial cells from asthmatic children, virus infection dampened apoptosis, reduced IFN-β production and increased inflammatory cytokine production. HRV1b infection also inhibited wound repair capacity of epithelial cells isolated from non-asthmatic children and exaggerated the defective repair response seen in epithelial cells from asthmatics. Addition of IFN-β restored apoptosis, suppressed virus replication and improved repair of airway epithelial cells from asthmatics but did not reduce inflammatory cytokine production. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, HRV infection delays repair and inhibits apoptotic processes in epithelial cells from non-asthmatic and asthmatic children. The delayed repair is further exaggerated in cells from asthmatic children and is only partially reversed by exogenous IFN-β. SN - 1365-2222 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27238549/Impaired_airway_epithelial_cell_responses_from_children_with_asthma_to_rhinoviral_infection_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/cea.12767 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -