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Enteroviruses and Rhinoviruses: Molecular Epidemiology of the Most Influenza-Like Illness Associated Viruses in Senegal.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2016 08 03; 95(2):339-47.AJ

Abstract

Different viruses have been identified as etiologic agents of respiratory tract infections, including severe cases. Among these, human rhinoviruses (HRVs) and human enteroviruses (HEVs) are recognized as leading causes. The present study describes the molecular epidemiology of HRVs and HEVs in Senegal over a 3-year surveillance period. From January 2012 to December 2014, nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs specimen were collected from patients with influenza-like illness (ILI). A real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed for HRV and HEV detection using the RV16 kit. Two regions were targeted for the molecular characterization of RVs: 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) and viral protein 4/viral protein 2 (VP4/VP2) transition region. For enteroviruses (EVs) phylogeny, VP1 gene was targeted. A total of 4,194 samples were collected. Children up to 5 years accounted for 52.9%. Among them, 1,415 (33.7%) were positive for HRV, 857 (20.4%) for HEV, and 437 cases of dual infections HRV/HEV. HRVs and HEVs were identified significantly in children aged 5 years or less. Only cough and vomiting signs were observed with significant association with viral infection. Both viruses co-circulated all year long with a marked increase of activity during rainy and cold period. All HRV types circulate in Senegal. HRV-A and C groups were the most common. HEV serotyping identified coxsackie B viruses (CBV) only. VP1 region revealed different CBV (CBV1, CBV2, CBV3, CBV4, and CBV5), echoviruses, coxsackieviruses A4-like strains and a poliovirus 2. The results suggest strong year-round respiratory picornavirus activity in children up to 5 years of age. Molecular studies identified a wide variety of RVs along with diverse EVs in samples from patients with ILI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unité de Virologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal.Unité de Virologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal.Unité de Virologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal.Unité d'Epidémiologie des Maladies Infectieuses, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal.Unité de Virologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal.Unité de Virologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal.Unité de Virologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal.Unité de Virologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal.Unité d'Epidémiologie des Maladies Infectieuses, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal.Unité de Virologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal.Unité de Virologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal. niang@pasteur.sn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27246444

Citation

Fall, Amary, et al. "Enteroviruses and Rhinoviruses: Molecular Epidemiology of the Most Influenza-Like Illness Associated Viruses in Senegal." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 95, no. 2, 2016, pp. 339-47.
Fall A, Dia N, Kébé O, et al. Enteroviruses and Rhinoviruses: Molecular Epidemiology of the Most Influenza-Like Illness Associated Viruses in Senegal. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2016;95(2):339-47.
Fall, A., Dia, N., Kébé, O., Sarr, F. D., Kiori, D. E., Cissé, e. l. . H. A., Sy, S., Goudiaby, D., Richard, V., Diop, O. M., & Niang, M. N. (2016). Enteroviruses and Rhinoviruses: Molecular Epidemiology of the Most Influenza-Like Illness Associated Viruses in Senegal. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 95(2), 339-47. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0799
Fall A, et al. Enteroviruses and Rhinoviruses: Molecular Epidemiology of the Most Influenza-Like Illness Associated Viruses in Senegal. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2016 08 3;95(2):339-47. PubMed PMID: 27246444.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Enteroviruses and Rhinoviruses: Molecular Epidemiology of the Most Influenza-Like Illness Associated Viruses in Senegal. AU - Fall,Amary, AU - Dia,Ndongo, AU - Kébé,Ousmane, AU - Sarr,Fatoumata Diene, AU - Kiori,Davy E, AU - Cissé,El Hadj Abdoul Khadir, AU - Sy,Sara, AU - Goudiaby,Deborah, AU - Richard,Vincent, AU - Diop,Ousmane Madiagne, AU - Niang,Mbayame Ndiaye, Y1 - 2016/05/31/ PY - 2015/11/06/received PY - 2016/04/04/accepted PY - 2016/6/2/entrez PY - 2016/6/2/pubmed PY - 2017/5/23/medline SP - 339 EP - 47 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 95 IS - 2 N2 - Different viruses have been identified as etiologic agents of respiratory tract infections, including severe cases. Among these, human rhinoviruses (HRVs) and human enteroviruses (HEVs) are recognized as leading causes. The present study describes the molecular epidemiology of HRVs and HEVs in Senegal over a 3-year surveillance period. From January 2012 to December 2014, nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs specimen were collected from patients with influenza-like illness (ILI). A real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed for HRV and HEV detection using the RV16 kit. Two regions were targeted for the molecular characterization of RVs: 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) and viral protein 4/viral protein 2 (VP4/VP2) transition region. For enteroviruses (EVs) phylogeny, VP1 gene was targeted. A total of 4,194 samples were collected. Children up to 5 years accounted for 52.9%. Among them, 1,415 (33.7%) were positive for HRV, 857 (20.4%) for HEV, and 437 cases of dual infections HRV/HEV. HRVs and HEVs were identified significantly in children aged 5 years or less. Only cough and vomiting signs were observed with significant association with viral infection. Both viruses co-circulated all year long with a marked increase of activity during rainy and cold period. All HRV types circulate in Senegal. HRV-A and C groups were the most common. HEV serotyping identified coxsackie B viruses (CBV) only. VP1 region revealed different CBV (CBV1, CBV2, CBV3, CBV4, and CBV5), echoviruses, coxsackieviruses A4-like strains and a poliovirus 2. The results suggest strong year-round respiratory picornavirus activity in children up to 5 years of age. Molecular studies identified a wide variety of RVs along with diverse EVs in samples from patients with ILI. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27246444/Enteroviruses_and_Rhinoviruses:_Molecular_Epidemiology_of_the_Most_Influenza_Like_Illness_Associated_Viruses_in_Senegal_ L2 - https://ajtmh.org/doi/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0799 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -