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Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016.

Abstract

Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (2). Cases in pregnant women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection who have either 1) symptomatic infection or 2) asymptomatic infection with diagnosed complications of pregnancy can be reported as cases of Zika virus disease to ArboNET* (2), CDC's national arboviral diseases surveillance system. Under existing interim guidelines from the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), asymptomatic Zika virus infections in pregnant women who do not have known pregnancy complications are not reportable. ArboNET does not currently include pregnancy surveillance information (e.g., gestational age or pregnancy exposures) or pregnancy outcomes. To understand the full impact of infection on the fetus and neonate, other systems are needed for reporting and active monitoring of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Thus, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, CDC established two surveillance systems to monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection(†) in the United States and territories: 1) the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR),(§) which monitors pregnant women residing in U.S. states and all U.S. territories except Puerto Rico, and 2) the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS), which monitors pregnant women residing in Puerto Rico. As of May 12, 2016, the surveillance systems were monitoring 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection from participating U.S. states and territories, respectively. Tracking and monitoring clinical presentation of Zika virus infection, all prenatal testing, and adverse consequences of Zika virus infection during pregnancy are critical to better characterize the risk for congenital infection, the performance of prenatal diagnostic testing, and the spectrum of adverse congenital outcomes. These data will improve clinical guidance, inform counseling messages for pregnant women, and facilitate planning for clinical and public health services for affected families.

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    MeSH

    District of Columbia
    Female
    Humans
    Population Surveillance
    Pregnancy
    Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
    Puerto Rico
    Registries
    United States
    Zika Virus
    Zika Virus Infection

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27248295

    Citation

    Simeone, Regina M., et al. "Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 65, no. 20, 2016, pp. 514-9.
    Simeone RM, Shapiro-Mendoza CK, Meaney-Delman D, et al. Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016;65(20):514-9.
    Simeone, R. M., Shapiro-Mendoza, C. K., Meaney-Delman, D., Petersen, E. E., Galang, R. R., Oduyebo, T., ... Honein, M. A. (2016). Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 65(20), pp. 514-9. doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm6520e1.
    Simeone RM, et al. Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 May 27;65(20):514-9. PubMed PMID: 27248295.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016. AU - Simeone,Regina M, AU - Shapiro-Mendoza,Carrie K, AU - Meaney-Delman,Dana, AU - Petersen,Emily E, AU - Galang,Romeo R, AU - Oduyebo,Titilope, AU - Rivera-Garcia,Brenda, AU - Valencia-Prado,Miguel, AU - Newsome,Kimberly B, AU - Pérez-Padilla,Janice, AU - Williams,Tonya R, AU - Biggerstaff,Matthew, AU - Jamieson,Denise J, AU - Honein,Margaret A, AU - ,, Y1 - 2016/05/27/ PY - 2016/6/2/entrez PY - 2016/6/2/pubmed PY - 2017/1/12/medline SP - 514 EP - 9 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. VL - 65 IS - 20 N2 - Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (2). Cases in pregnant women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection who have either 1) symptomatic infection or 2) asymptomatic infection with diagnosed complications of pregnancy can be reported as cases of Zika virus disease to ArboNET* (2), CDC's national arboviral diseases surveillance system. Under existing interim guidelines from the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), asymptomatic Zika virus infections in pregnant women who do not have known pregnancy complications are not reportable. ArboNET does not currently include pregnancy surveillance information (e.g., gestational age or pregnancy exposures) or pregnancy outcomes. To understand the full impact of infection on the fetus and neonate, other systems are needed for reporting and active monitoring of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Thus, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, CDC established two surveillance systems to monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection(†) in the United States and territories: 1) the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR),(§) which monitors pregnant women residing in U.S. states and all U.S. territories except Puerto Rico, and 2) the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS), which monitors pregnant women residing in Puerto Rico. As of May 12, 2016, the surveillance systems were monitoring 157 and 122 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection from participating U.S. states and territories, respectively. Tracking and monitoring clinical presentation of Zika virus infection, all prenatal testing, and adverse consequences of Zika virus infection during pregnancy are critical to better characterize the risk for congenital infection, the performance of prenatal diagnostic testing, and the spectrum of adverse congenital outcomes. These data will improve clinical guidance, inform counseling messages for pregnant women, and facilitate planning for clinical and public health services for affected families. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27248295/Possible_Zika_Virus_Infection_Among_Pregnant_Women___United_States_and_Territories_May_2016_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6520e1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -