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Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States.
Nutrients. 2016 05 30; 8(6)N

Abstract

Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1-5 years using data from the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1-5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7), 3.9% (2.0, 4.3), and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7), respectively. The prevalence of both ID and anemia were higher among children 1-2 years (p < 0.05). In addition, 50% of anemic children 1-2 years were iron deficient. This analysis provides an update on the prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA for a representative sample of US children. Our results suggest little change in these indicators over the past decade. Monitoring of ID and anemia is critical and prevention of ID in early childhood should remain a public health priority.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. kso7@cdc.gov.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. hgk3@cdc.gov.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. zam0@cdc.gov.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. kxs5@cdc.gov.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27249004

Citation

Gupta, Priya M., et al. "Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia Among Young Children in the United States." Nutrients, vol. 8, no. 6, 2016.
Gupta PM, Perrine CG, Mei Z, et al. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States. Nutrients. 2016;8(6).
Gupta, P. M., Perrine, C. G., Mei, Z., & Scanlon, K. S. (2016). Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States. Nutrients, 8(6). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu8060330
Gupta PM, et al. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia Among Young Children in the United States. Nutrients. 2016 05 30;8(6) PubMed PMID: 27249004.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States. AU - Gupta,Priya M, AU - Perrine,Cria G, AU - Mei,Zuguo, AU - Scanlon,Kelley S, Y1 - 2016/05/30/ PY - 2016/04/13/received PY - 2016/05/26/revised PY - 2016/05/26/accepted PY - 2016/6/2/entrez PY - 2016/6/2/pubmed PY - 2019/3/21/medline KW - NHANES KW - anemia KW - iron deficiency JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 8 IS - 6 N2 - Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1-5 years using data from the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1-5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7), 3.9% (2.0, 4.3), and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7), respectively. The prevalence of both ID and anemia were higher among children 1-2 years (p < 0.05). In addition, 50% of anemic children 1-2 years were iron deficient. This analysis provides an update on the prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA for a representative sample of US children. Our results suggest little change in these indicators over the past decade. Monitoring of ID and anemia is critical and prevention of ID in early childhood should remain a public health priority. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27249004/full_citation L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu8060330 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -