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Dietary Fat Intake and Radiographic Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis: Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Few studies have investigated the role of dietary factors on knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. We examined the prospective association of dietary fat intake with radiographic progression of knee OA.

METHODS

In the Osteoarthritis Initiative, 2,092 participants with radiographic knee OA and having baseline dietary data were followed at yearly intervals up to 48 months. Dietary intakes of fatty acids were assessed with the Block Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire. To evaluate radiographic progression of knee OA, we used quantitative joint space width (JSW) between the medial femur and tibia of the knee based on fixed-flexion posteroanterior radiographs. Linear mixed models for repeated measures were used to test the association between dietary fat and JSW loss over time.

RESULTS

We observed significant positive relationships of total fat and saturated fatty acids (SFA) intakes with JSW loss. With increasing quartiles of total fat intake, JSW decreases over 48 months were 0.26 mm, 0.27 mm, 0.31 mm and 0.35 mm, respectively (P = 0.02 for trend). Similar association was observed between SFA intake and JSW loss. In contrast, higher intakes of mono- (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and higher ratio of PUFA to SFA were associated with a reduced JSW loss.

CONCLUSION

High intakes of total fat and SFA may be associated with increased structural knee OA progression, while MUFA and PUFA may reduce radiographic progression. Replication of these novel findings in other prospective studies is needed to confirm if reduction in SFA intake and increase in unsaturated fat intake lead to delayed knee OA progression.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

    ,

    Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

    ,

    Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

    ,

    University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester.

    ,

    Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

    Center for Primary Care and Prevention, Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island, Pawtucket, and Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.

    Source

    Arthritis care & research 69:3 2017 03 pg 368-375

    MeSH

    Aged
    Bayes Theorem
    Chi-Square Distribution
    Dietary Fats
    Disease Progression
    Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated
    Female
    Healthy Diet
    Humans
    Knee Joint
    Linear Models
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Osteoarthritis, Knee
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Protective Factors
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Risk Reduction Behavior
    Time Factors
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27273934

    Citation

    Lu, Bing, et al. "Dietary Fat Intake and Radiographic Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis: Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative." Arthritis Care & Research, vol. 69, no. 3, 2017, pp. 368-375.
    Lu B, Driban JB, Xu C, et al. Dietary Fat Intake and Radiographic Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis: Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2017;69(3):368-375.
    Lu, B., Driban, J. B., Xu, C., Lapane, K. L., McAlindon, T. E., & Eaton, C. B. (2017). Dietary Fat Intake and Radiographic Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis: Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Arthritis Care & Research, 69(3), pp. 368-375. doi:10.1002/acr.22952.
    Lu B, et al. Dietary Fat Intake and Radiographic Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis: Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2017;69(3):368-375. PubMed PMID: 27273934.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary Fat Intake and Radiographic Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis: Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative. AU - Lu,Bing, AU - Driban,Jeffrey B, AU - Xu,Chang, AU - Lapane,Kate L, AU - McAlindon,Timothy E, AU - Eaton,Charles B, PY - 2015/10/15/received PY - 2016/04/28/revised PY - 2016/05/31/accepted PY - 2016/6/9/pubmed PY - 2017/7/14/medline PY - 2016/6/9/entrez SP - 368 EP - 375 JF - Arthritis care & research JO - Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) VL - 69 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Few studies have investigated the role of dietary factors on knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. We examined the prospective association of dietary fat intake with radiographic progression of knee OA. METHODS: In the Osteoarthritis Initiative, 2,092 participants with radiographic knee OA and having baseline dietary data were followed at yearly intervals up to 48 months. Dietary intakes of fatty acids were assessed with the Block Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire. To evaluate radiographic progression of knee OA, we used quantitative joint space width (JSW) between the medial femur and tibia of the knee based on fixed-flexion posteroanterior radiographs. Linear mixed models for repeated measures were used to test the association between dietary fat and JSW loss over time. RESULTS: We observed significant positive relationships of total fat and saturated fatty acids (SFA) intakes with JSW loss. With increasing quartiles of total fat intake, JSW decreases over 48 months were 0.26 mm, 0.27 mm, 0.31 mm and 0.35 mm, respectively (P = 0.02 for trend). Similar association was observed between SFA intake and JSW loss. In contrast, higher intakes of mono- (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and higher ratio of PUFA to SFA were associated with a reduced JSW loss. CONCLUSION: High intakes of total fat and SFA may be associated with increased structural knee OA progression, while MUFA and PUFA may reduce radiographic progression. Replication of these novel findings in other prospective studies is needed to confirm if reduction in SFA intake and increase in unsaturated fat intake lead to delayed knee OA progression. SN - 2151-4658 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27273934/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.22952 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -