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Polyphenol- and fibre-rich dried fruits with green tea attenuate starch-derived postprandial blood glucose and insulin: a randomised, controlled, single-blind, cross-over intervention.
Br J Nutr 2016; 116(3):443-50BJ

Abstract

Polyphenol- and fibre-rich foods (PFRF) have the potential to affect postprandial glycaemic responses by reducing glucose absorption, and thus decreasing the glycaemic response of foods when consumed together. A randomised, single-blind, cross-over study was conducted on sixteen healthy volunteers to test whether PFRF could attenuate postprandial blood glucose in healthy volunteers when added to a source of carbohydrate (starch in bread). This is the first study to examine the effects of a meal comprised of components to inhibit each stage of the biochemical pathway, leading up to the appearance of glucose in the blood. The volunteers were fasted and attended four visits: two control visits (bread, water, balancing sugars) and two test visits (single and double dose of PFRF) where they consumed bread, water and PFRF. Blood samples were collected at 0 (fasted), 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after consumption. The PFRF components were tested for α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory potential in vitro. Plasma glucose was lower after consumption of both doses compared with controls: lower dose, change in mean incremental areas under the glucose curves (IAUC)=-27·4 (sd 7·5) %, P<0·001; higher dose, IAUC=-49·0 (sd 15·3) %, P<0·001; insulin IAUC was also attenuated by-46·9 (sd 13·4) %, P<0·01. Consistent with this, the polyphenol components of the PFRF inhibited α-amylase (green tea, strawberry, blackberry and blackcurrant) and α-glucosidase (green tea) activities in vitro. The PFRF have a pronounced and significant lowering effect on postprandial blood glucose and insulin response in humans, due in part to inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase, as well as glucose transport.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Food Science and Nutrition,University of Leeds,Leeds LS2 9JT,UK.School of Food Science and Nutrition,University of Leeds,Leeds LS2 9JT,UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27278405

Citation

Nyambe-Silavwe, H, and G Williamson. "Polyphenol- and Fibre-rich Dried Fruits With Green Tea Attenuate Starch-derived Postprandial Blood Glucose and Insulin: a Randomised, Controlled, Single-blind, Cross-over Intervention." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 116, no. 3, 2016, pp. 443-50.
Nyambe-Silavwe H, Williamson G. Polyphenol- and fibre-rich dried fruits with green tea attenuate starch-derived postprandial blood glucose and insulin: a randomised, controlled, single-blind, cross-over intervention. Br J Nutr. 2016;116(3):443-50.
Nyambe-Silavwe, H., & Williamson, G. (2016). Polyphenol- and fibre-rich dried fruits with green tea attenuate starch-derived postprandial blood glucose and insulin: a randomised, controlled, single-blind, cross-over intervention. The British Journal of Nutrition, 116(3), pp. 443-50. doi:10.1017/S0007114516002221.
Nyambe-Silavwe H, Williamson G. Polyphenol- and Fibre-rich Dried Fruits With Green Tea Attenuate Starch-derived Postprandial Blood Glucose and Insulin: a Randomised, Controlled, Single-blind, Cross-over Intervention. Br J Nutr. 2016;116(3):443-50. PubMed PMID: 27278405.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Polyphenol- and fibre-rich dried fruits with green tea attenuate starch-derived postprandial blood glucose and insulin: a randomised, controlled, single-blind, cross-over intervention. AU - Nyambe-Silavwe,H, AU - Williamson,G, Y1 - 2016/06/09/ PY - 2016/6/10/entrez PY - 2016/6/10/pubmed PY - 2017/5/18/medline KW - α-Amylase KW - α-Glucosidase KW - Diabetes KW - Fibre KW - GI glycaemic index KW - IAUC incremental areas under the glucose curves KW - IC50 concentration required for 50 % inhibition KW - PFRF polyphenol- and fibre-rich food KW - Polyphenols KW - Postprandial glucose SP - 443 EP - 50 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 116 IS - 3 N2 - Polyphenol- and fibre-rich foods (PFRF) have the potential to affect postprandial glycaemic responses by reducing glucose absorption, and thus decreasing the glycaemic response of foods when consumed together. A randomised, single-blind, cross-over study was conducted on sixteen healthy volunteers to test whether PFRF could attenuate postprandial blood glucose in healthy volunteers when added to a source of carbohydrate (starch in bread). This is the first study to examine the effects of a meal comprised of components to inhibit each stage of the biochemical pathway, leading up to the appearance of glucose in the blood. The volunteers were fasted and attended four visits: two control visits (bread, water, balancing sugars) and two test visits (single and double dose of PFRF) where they consumed bread, water and PFRF. Blood samples were collected at 0 (fasted), 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after consumption. The PFRF components were tested for α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory potential in vitro. Plasma glucose was lower after consumption of both doses compared with controls: lower dose, change in mean incremental areas under the glucose curves (IAUC)=-27·4 (sd 7·5) %, P<0·001; higher dose, IAUC=-49·0 (sd 15·3) %, P<0·001; insulin IAUC was also attenuated by-46·9 (sd 13·4) %, P<0·01. Consistent with this, the polyphenol components of the PFRF inhibited α-amylase (green tea, strawberry, blackberry and blackcurrant) and α-glucosidase (green tea) activities in vitro. The PFRF have a pronounced and significant lowering effect on postprandial blood glucose and insulin response in humans, due in part to inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase, as well as glucose transport. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27278405/Polyphenol__and_fibre_rich_dried_fruits_with_green_tea_attenuate_starch_derived_postprandial_blood_glucose_and_insulin:_a_randomised_controlled_single_blind_cross_over_intervention_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114516002221/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -