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Secondhand smoke in the operating room? Precautionary practices lacking for surgical smoke.
Am J Ind Med 2016; 59(11):1020-1031AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Consensus organizations, government bodies, and healthcare organization guidelines recommend that surgical smoke be evacuated at the source by local exhaust ventilation (LEV) (i.e., smoke evacuators or wall suctions with inline filters).

METHODS

Data are from NIOSH's Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers module on precautionary practices for surgical smoke.

RESULTS

Four thousand five hundred thirty-three survey respondents reported exposure to surgical smoke: 4,500 during electrosurgery; 1,392 during laser surgery procedures. Respondents were mainly nurses (56%) and anesthesiologists (21%). Only 14% of those exposed during electrosurgery reported LEV was always used during these procedures, while 47% reported use during laser surgery. Those reporting LEV was always used were also more likely to report training and employer standard procedures addressing the hazards of surgical smoke. Few respondents reported use of respiratory protection.

CONCLUSIONS

Study findings can be used to raise awareness of the marginal use of exposure controls and impediments for their use. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:1020-1031, 2016. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, Ohio. asteege@cdc.gov.Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, Ohio.Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27282626

Citation

Steege, Andrea L., et al. "Secondhand Smoke in the Operating Room? Precautionary Practices Lacking for Surgical Smoke." American Journal of Industrial Medicine, vol. 59, no. 11, 2016, pp. 1020-1031.
Steege AL, Boiano JM, Sweeney MH. Secondhand smoke in the operating room? Precautionary practices lacking for surgical smoke. Am J Ind Med. 2016;59(11):1020-1031.
Steege, A. L., Boiano, J. M., & Sweeney, M. H. (2016). Secondhand smoke in the operating room? Precautionary practices lacking for surgical smoke. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 59(11), pp. 1020-1031. doi:10.1002/ajim.22614.
Steege AL, Boiano JM, Sweeney MH. Secondhand Smoke in the Operating Room? Precautionary Practices Lacking for Surgical Smoke. Am J Ind Med. 2016;59(11):1020-1031. PubMed PMID: 27282626.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Secondhand smoke in the operating room? Precautionary practices lacking for surgical smoke. AU - Steege,Andrea L, AU - Boiano,James M, AU - Sweeney,Marie H, Y1 - 2016/06/10/ PY - 2016/05/10/accepted PY - 2016/10/19/pubmed PY - 2017/12/21/medline PY - 2016/6/11/entrez KW - electrosurgery KW - engineering controls KW - healthcare workers KW - laser surgery KW - local exhaust ventilation (LEV) KW - smoke evacuators KW - surgical smoke SP - 1020 EP - 1031 JF - American journal of industrial medicine JO - Am. J. Ind. Med. VL - 59 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Consensus organizations, government bodies, and healthcare organization guidelines recommend that surgical smoke be evacuated at the source by local exhaust ventilation (LEV) (i.e., smoke evacuators or wall suctions with inline filters). METHODS: Data are from NIOSH's Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers module on precautionary practices for surgical smoke. RESULTS: Four thousand five hundred thirty-three survey respondents reported exposure to surgical smoke: 4,500 during electrosurgery; 1,392 during laser surgery procedures. Respondents were mainly nurses (56%) and anesthesiologists (21%). Only 14% of those exposed during electrosurgery reported LEV was always used during these procedures, while 47% reported use during laser surgery. Those reporting LEV was always used were also more likely to report training and employer standard procedures addressing the hazards of surgical smoke. Few respondents reported use of respiratory protection. CONCLUSIONS: Study findings can be used to raise awareness of the marginal use of exposure controls and impediments for their use. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:1020-1031, 2016. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. SN - 1097-0274 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27282626/Secondhand_smoke_in_the_operating_room_Precautionary_practices_lacking_for_surgical_smoke_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22614 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -