Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prospective Changes in Healthy Lifestyle Among Midlife Women: When Psychological Symptoms Get in the Way.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Anxiety and depression are linked to increased risk of cardiometabolic disease and mortality, and unhealthy behaviors may be the key mechanisms underlying these associations. Although higher levels of psychological symptoms are associated with individual unhealthy behaviors (e.g., physical activity, smoking), their roles in overall lifestyle remain understudied.

METHODS

Midlife women (n=55,395) from the cohort Nurses' Health Study reported anxiety and depression symptoms in 1988 and 1992, respectively. Health behaviors (i.e., physical inactivity, BMI, diet, and alcohol and tobacco consumption) were measured in self-administered questionnaires in 1988 or 1992, and every 4 years until the last assessment available (2010; follow-up, 18-22 years). Data were analyzed in 2014-2015. Women were categorized according to initial level of psychological symptoms (e.g., lower versus higher anxiety symptoms).

RESULTS

Despite slight improvements in healthy lifestyle over time among women with higher versus lower anxiety (βinteraction=0.002, 95% CI=0.001, 0.003), those experiencing more severe symptoms had a consistently less healthy lifestyle over time (p<0.0001). Each SD increase in anxiety symptoms was related to a decrease in healthy lifestyle score throughout follow-up (βpooled=-0.09, 95% CI=-0.09, -0.08). Women with higher versus lower anxiety symptoms also had decreased odds of having a healthy lifestyle in 2010 (AOR=0.78, 95% CI=0.75, 0.81), particularly among women with an initially unhealthy lifestyle (pinteraction≤0.0001). Comparable patterns were observed with depression symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS

Among midlife women, anxiety and depression symptoms were associated with unhealthier lifestyle throughout follow-up and reduced odds of having a healthy lifestyle 20 years later. Treating psychological symptoms may promote healthier lifestyles.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: ctrudel@hsph.harvard.edu.

    ,

    Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts;; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

    ,

    Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts;

    ,

    Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

    Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

    Source

    MeSH

    Anxiety
    Depression
    Exercise
    Female
    Health Behavior
    Healthy Diet
    Healthy Lifestyle
    Humans
    Longitudinal Studies
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27291076

    Citation

    Trudel-Fitzgerald, Claudia, et al. "Prospective Changes in Healthy Lifestyle Among Midlife Women: when Psychological Symptoms Get in the Way." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 51, no. 3, 2016, pp. 327-35.
    Trudel-Fitzgerald C, Tworoger SS, Poole EM, et al. Prospective Changes in Healthy Lifestyle Among Midlife Women: When Psychological Symptoms Get in the Way. Am J Prev Med. 2016;51(3):327-35.
    Trudel-Fitzgerald, C., Tworoger, S. S., Poole, E. M., Williams, D. R., & Kubzansky, L. D. (2016). Prospective Changes in Healthy Lifestyle Among Midlife Women: When Psychological Symptoms Get in the Way. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 51(3), pp. 327-35. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2016.04.021.
    Trudel-Fitzgerald C, et al. Prospective Changes in Healthy Lifestyle Among Midlife Women: when Psychological Symptoms Get in the Way. Am J Prev Med. 2016;51(3):327-35. PubMed PMID: 27291076.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective Changes in Healthy Lifestyle Among Midlife Women: When Psychological Symptoms Get in the Way. AU - Trudel-Fitzgerald,Claudia, AU - Tworoger,Shelley S, AU - Poole,Elizabeth M, AU - Williams,David R, AU - Kubzansky,Laura D, Y1 - 2016/06/09/ PY - 2015/10/01/received PY - 2016/04/15/revised PY - 2016/04/15/accepted PY - 2016/6/14/entrez PY - 2016/6/14/pubmed PY - 2018/1/24/medline SP - 327 EP - 35 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 51 IS - 3 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Anxiety and depression are linked to increased risk of cardiometabolic disease and mortality, and unhealthy behaviors may be the key mechanisms underlying these associations. Although higher levels of psychological symptoms are associated with individual unhealthy behaviors (e.g., physical activity, smoking), their roles in overall lifestyle remain understudied. METHODS: Midlife women (n=55,395) from the cohort Nurses' Health Study reported anxiety and depression symptoms in 1988 and 1992, respectively. Health behaviors (i.e., physical inactivity, BMI, diet, and alcohol and tobacco consumption) were measured in self-administered questionnaires in 1988 or 1992, and every 4 years until the last assessment available (2010; follow-up, 18-22 years). Data were analyzed in 2014-2015. Women were categorized according to initial level of psychological symptoms (e.g., lower versus higher anxiety symptoms). RESULTS: Despite slight improvements in healthy lifestyle over time among women with higher versus lower anxiety (βinteraction=0.002, 95% CI=0.001, 0.003), those experiencing more severe symptoms had a consistently less healthy lifestyle over time (p<0.0001). Each SD increase in anxiety symptoms was related to a decrease in healthy lifestyle score throughout follow-up (βpooled=-0.09, 95% CI=-0.09, -0.08). Women with higher versus lower anxiety symptoms also had decreased odds of having a healthy lifestyle in 2010 (AOR=0.78, 95% CI=0.75, 0.81), particularly among women with an initially unhealthy lifestyle (pinteraction≤0.0001). Comparable patterns were observed with depression symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Among midlife women, anxiety and depression symptoms were associated with unhealthier lifestyle throughout follow-up and reduced odds of having a healthy lifestyle 20 years later. Treating psychological symptoms may promote healthier lifestyles. SN - 1873-2607 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27291076/Prospective_Changes_in_Healthy_Lifestyle_Among_Midlife_Women:_When_Psychological_Symptoms_Get_in_the_Way_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-3797(16)30130-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -