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Maternal prenatal intake of one-carbon metabolism nutrients and risk of childhood leukemia.
Cancer Causes Control. 2016 07; 27(7):929-40.CC

Abstract

PURPOSE

Folate, vitamins B12 and B6, riboflavin, and methionine are critical nutrients for the one-carbon metabolism cycle involved in DNA synthesis and epigenetic processes. We examined the association between maternal intake of these nutrients before pregnancy and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a matched case-control study.

METHODS

Maternal dietary intake and vitamin supplement use in the year before pregnancy was assessed by food frequency questionnaire for 681 ALL cases, 103 AML cases, and 1076 controls. Principal component analysis was used to construct a variable representing combined nutrient intake, and conditional logistic regression estimated the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association of ALL and AML with the principal component and each nutrient.

RESULTS

Higher maternal intake of one-carbon metabolism nutrients from food and supplements combined was associated with reduced risk of ALL (OR for one-unit change in the principal component = 0.91, CI 0.84-0.99) and possibly AML (OR for the principal component = 0.83, CI 0.66-1.04). When analyzed separately, intake of supplements high in these nutrients was associated with a reduced risk of ALL in children of Hispanic women only.

CONCLUSIONS

In conclusion, these data suggest that higher maternal intake of one-carbon metabolism nutrients may reduce risk of childhood leukemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 1995 University Avenue, Suite 460, Berkeley, CA, 94704, USA. amandawsinger@gmail.com.Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 1995 University Avenue, Suite 460, Berkeley, CA, 94704, USA.Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 1995 University Avenue, Suite 460, Berkeley, CA, 94704, USA.Children's Hospital Oakland, Oakland, CA, USA.Division of Neonatology and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, 1995 University Avenue, Suite 460, Berkeley, CA, 94704, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27294727

Citation

Singer, Amanda W., et al. "Maternal Prenatal Intake of One-carbon Metabolism Nutrients and Risk of Childhood Leukemia." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 27, no. 7, 2016, pp. 929-40.
Singer AW, Selvin S, Block G, et al. Maternal prenatal intake of one-carbon metabolism nutrients and risk of childhood leukemia. Cancer Causes Control. 2016;27(7):929-40.
Singer, A. W., Selvin, S., Block, G., Golden, C., Carmichael, S. L., & Metayer, C. (2016). Maternal prenatal intake of one-carbon metabolism nutrients and risk of childhood leukemia. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 27(7), 929-40. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-016-0773-y
Singer AW, et al. Maternal Prenatal Intake of One-carbon Metabolism Nutrients and Risk of Childhood Leukemia. Cancer Causes Control. 2016;27(7):929-40. PubMed PMID: 27294727.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal prenatal intake of one-carbon metabolism nutrients and risk of childhood leukemia. AU - Singer,Amanda W, AU - Selvin,Steve, AU - Block,Gladys, AU - Golden,Carla, AU - Carmichael,Suzan L, AU - Metayer,Catherine, Y1 - 2016/06/13/ PY - 2016/01/31/received PY - 2016/06/04/accepted PY - 2016/6/14/entrez PY - 2016/6/14/pubmed PY - 2017/2/6/medline KW - Cancer risk KW - Case/control KW - Epidemiology KW - Methyl donors KW - Micronutrients SP - 929 EP - 40 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 27 IS - 7 N2 - PURPOSE: Folate, vitamins B12 and B6, riboflavin, and methionine are critical nutrients for the one-carbon metabolism cycle involved in DNA synthesis and epigenetic processes. We examined the association between maternal intake of these nutrients before pregnancy and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a matched case-control study. METHODS: Maternal dietary intake and vitamin supplement use in the year before pregnancy was assessed by food frequency questionnaire for 681 ALL cases, 103 AML cases, and 1076 controls. Principal component analysis was used to construct a variable representing combined nutrient intake, and conditional logistic regression estimated the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association of ALL and AML with the principal component and each nutrient. RESULTS: Higher maternal intake of one-carbon metabolism nutrients from food and supplements combined was associated with reduced risk of ALL (OR for one-unit change in the principal component = 0.91, CI 0.84-0.99) and possibly AML (OR for the principal component = 0.83, CI 0.66-1.04). When analyzed separately, intake of supplements high in these nutrients was associated with a reduced risk of ALL in children of Hispanic women only. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, these data suggest that higher maternal intake of one-carbon metabolism nutrients may reduce risk of childhood leukemia. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27294727/Maternal_prenatal_intake_of_one_carbon_metabolism_nutrients_and_risk_of_childhood_leukemia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-016-0773-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -