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Consumption of Dairy Products in Relation to Changes in Anthropometric Variables in Adult Populations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.
PLoS One. 2016; 11(6):e0157461.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The current state of knowledge regarding the association of dairy products and weight gain, overweight, and obesity is based on studies reporting contradicting and inconclusive results. The aim of the present study was thus to clarify the link between dairy consumption in relation to changes in anthropometric measures/adiposity by a meta-analytical approach.

METHODS

For the meta-analysis PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Sciences, and google scholar were searched by two independent authors up to May 2016 with no restriction to language or calendar date. Prospective cohort studies reporting about intake of dairy consumption (including milk, yogurt, cheese, butter) and changes in body weight or waist circumference, risk of overweight, obesity, or weight gain were eligible. Pooled effects were calculated using a random effects model, and also a fixed effect model for sensitivity analysis. Due to the heterogeneity of statistical analytical approaches of the studies the analysis were done separately for beta-coefficients of changes in body weight and/or waist circumference per serving of dairy, for differences in weight gain/gain in waist circumference when comparing extreme categories of dairy consumption, and for odds ratios in regard to weight gain, overweight/obesity, or abdominal obesity.

FINDINGS

24 studies (27 reports) met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review, and 22 studies provided sufficient data for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis of the five studies on changes in body weight per serving of dairy no significant results could be found for whole fat dairy and low fat dairy. However, there was inverse association between changes in body weight for each serving's increase of yogurt (beta: -40.99 gram/year, 95% CI, -48.09 to -33.88), whereas each serving's increase of cheese was positively associated (beta: -10.97 gram/year, 95% CI, 2.86 to 19.07). Furthermore, the highest dairy intake category was associated with a reduced risk of abdominal obesity (OR: 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.95), and risk of overweight (OR: 0.87; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.00) compared to the lowest intake category. No significant association could be observed for risk of weight gain.

CONCLUSION

In summary the results of the meta-analysis still reflect that dairy consumption was not positively related to changes in body weight. Yogurt was the only dairy food that showed some evidence for a beneficial effect, where higher intakes were inversely associated a reduced risk of obesity, changes in body weight or waist circumference. Further research is needed, since the overall interpretation of the results is limited by heterogeneous risk estimates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany.Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany.Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany.Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany.Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27310919

Citation

Schwingshackl, Lukas, et al. "Consumption of Dairy Products in Relation to Changes in Anthropometric Variables in Adult Populations: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies." PloS One, vol. 11, no. 6, 2016, pp. e0157461.
Schwingshackl L, Hoffmann G, Schwedhelm C, et al. Consumption of Dairy Products in Relation to Changes in Anthropometric Variables in Adult Populations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. PLoS One. 2016;11(6):e0157461.
Schwingshackl, L., Hoffmann, G., Schwedhelm, C., Kalle-Uhlmann, T., Missbach, B., Knüppel, S., & Boeing, H. (2016). Consumption of Dairy Products in Relation to Changes in Anthropometric Variables in Adult Populations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. PloS One, 11(6), e0157461. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0157461
Schwingshackl L, et al. Consumption of Dairy Products in Relation to Changes in Anthropometric Variables in Adult Populations: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. PLoS One. 2016;11(6):e0157461. PubMed PMID: 27310919.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of Dairy Products in Relation to Changes in Anthropometric Variables in Adult Populations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. AU - Schwingshackl,Lukas, AU - Hoffmann,Georg, AU - Schwedhelm,Carolina, AU - Kalle-Uhlmann,Tamara, AU - Missbach,Benjamin, AU - Knüppel,Sven, AU - Boeing,Heiner, Y1 - 2016/06/16/ PY - 2016/01/11/received PY - 2016/05/30/accepted PY - 2016/6/17/entrez PY - 2016/6/17/pubmed PY - 2017/7/14/medline SP - e0157461 EP - e0157461 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 11 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The current state of knowledge regarding the association of dairy products and weight gain, overweight, and obesity is based on studies reporting contradicting and inconclusive results. The aim of the present study was thus to clarify the link between dairy consumption in relation to changes in anthropometric measures/adiposity by a meta-analytical approach. METHODS: For the meta-analysis PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Sciences, and google scholar were searched by two independent authors up to May 2016 with no restriction to language or calendar date. Prospective cohort studies reporting about intake of dairy consumption (including milk, yogurt, cheese, butter) and changes in body weight or waist circumference, risk of overweight, obesity, or weight gain were eligible. Pooled effects were calculated using a random effects model, and also a fixed effect model for sensitivity analysis. Due to the heterogeneity of statistical analytical approaches of the studies the analysis were done separately for beta-coefficients of changes in body weight and/or waist circumference per serving of dairy, for differences in weight gain/gain in waist circumference when comparing extreme categories of dairy consumption, and for odds ratios in regard to weight gain, overweight/obesity, or abdominal obesity. FINDINGS: 24 studies (27 reports) met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review, and 22 studies provided sufficient data for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis of the five studies on changes in body weight per serving of dairy no significant results could be found for whole fat dairy and low fat dairy. However, there was inverse association between changes in body weight for each serving's increase of yogurt (beta: -40.99 gram/year, 95% CI, -48.09 to -33.88), whereas each serving's increase of cheese was positively associated (beta: -10.97 gram/year, 95% CI, 2.86 to 19.07). Furthermore, the highest dairy intake category was associated with a reduced risk of abdominal obesity (OR: 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.95), and risk of overweight (OR: 0.87; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.00) compared to the lowest intake category. No significant association could be observed for risk of weight gain. CONCLUSION: In summary the results of the meta-analysis still reflect that dairy consumption was not positively related to changes in body weight. Yogurt was the only dairy food that showed some evidence for a beneficial effect, where higher intakes were inversely associated a reduced risk of obesity, changes in body weight or waist circumference. Further research is needed, since the overall interpretation of the results is limited by heterogeneous risk estimates. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27310919/Consumption_of_Dairy_Products_in_Relation_to_Changes_in_Anthropometric_Variables_in_Adult_Populations:_A_Systematic_Review_and_Meta_Analysis_of_Cohort_Studies_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0157461 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -