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Rankings of iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes in relation to maternal characteristics of pregnant Canadian women.
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2016; 41(7):749-57AP

Abstract

Iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes in the prenatal period are important determinants of maternal and fetal health. The objective of this study was to examine iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes from diet and supplements in relation to maternal characteristics. Data were collected in a subsample of 1186 pregnant women from the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) Study, a cohort study including pregnant women recruited from 10 Canadian sites between 2008 and 2011. A food frequency questionnaire was administered to obtain rankings of iron, calcium, and vitamin D intake (16-21 weeks of pregnancy). Intakes from supplements were obtained from a separate questionnaire (6-13 weeks of pregnancy). Women were divided into 2 groups according to the median total intake of each nutrient. Supplement intake was an important contributor to total iron intake (median 74%, interquartile range (IQR) 0%-81%) and total vitamin D intake (median 60%, IQR 0%-73%), while the opposite was observed for calcium (median 18%, IQR 0%-27%). Being born outside of Canada was significantly associated with lower total intakes of iron, vitamin D, and calcium (p ≤ 0.01 for all). Consistent positive indicators of supplement use (iron, vitamin D, and calcium) were maternal age over 30 years and holding a university degree. In conclusion, among Canadian women, the probability of having lower iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes is higher among those born outside Canada; supplement intake is a major contributor to total iron and vitamin D intakes; and higher education level and age over 30 years are associated with supplement intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Centre de recherche du Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1H 5N4, Canada. b Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada.c School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montreal, QC H9X 3V9, Canada.d School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1H 8M5, Canada.e Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada.b Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada.e Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada.f Food Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9, Canada.f Food Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9, Canada.g Environmental Health, Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9, Canada.a Centre de recherche du Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1H 5N4, Canada. b Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27324651

Citation

Morisset, Anne-Sophie, et al. "Rankings of Iron, Vitamin D, and Calcium Intakes in Relation to Maternal Characteristics of Pregnant Canadian Women." Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism = Physiologie Appliquee, Nutrition Et Metabolisme, vol. 41, no. 7, 2016, pp. 749-57.
Morisset AS, Weiler HA, Dubois L, et al. Rankings of iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes in relation to maternal characteristics of pregnant Canadian women. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2016;41(7):749-57.
Morisset, A. S., Weiler, H. A., Dubois, L., Ashley-Martin, J., Shapiro, G. D., Dodds, L., ... Fraser, W. D. (2016). Rankings of iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes in relation to maternal characteristics of pregnant Canadian women. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism = Physiologie Appliquee, Nutrition Et Metabolisme, 41(7), pp. 749-57. doi:10.1139/apnm-2015-0588.
Morisset AS, et al. Rankings of Iron, Vitamin D, and Calcium Intakes in Relation to Maternal Characteristics of Pregnant Canadian Women. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2016;41(7):749-57. PubMed PMID: 27324651.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rankings of iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes in relation to maternal characteristics of pregnant Canadian women. AU - Morisset,Anne-Sophie, AU - Weiler,Hope A, AU - Dubois,Lise, AU - Ashley-Martin,Jillian, AU - Shapiro,Gabriel D, AU - Dodds,Linda, AU - Massarelli,Isabelle, AU - Vigneault,Michel, AU - Arbuckle,Tye E, AU - Fraser,William D, Y1 - 2016/03/11/ PY - 2016/6/22/entrez PY - 2016/6/22/pubmed PY - 2017/2/14/medline KW - calcium KW - fer KW - food frequency questionnaire KW - grossesse KW - iron KW - nutrition KW - pregnancy KW - questionnaire de fréquence alimentaire KW - supplements KW - suppléments KW - vitamin D KW - vitamine D SP - 749 EP - 57 JF - Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme JO - Appl Physiol Nutr Metab VL - 41 IS - 7 N2 - Iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes in the prenatal period are important determinants of maternal and fetal health. The objective of this study was to examine iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes from diet and supplements in relation to maternal characteristics. Data were collected in a subsample of 1186 pregnant women from the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) Study, a cohort study including pregnant women recruited from 10 Canadian sites between 2008 and 2011. A food frequency questionnaire was administered to obtain rankings of iron, calcium, and vitamin D intake (16-21 weeks of pregnancy). Intakes from supplements were obtained from a separate questionnaire (6-13 weeks of pregnancy). Women were divided into 2 groups according to the median total intake of each nutrient. Supplement intake was an important contributor to total iron intake (median 74%, interquartile range (IQR) 0%-81%) and total vitamin D intake (median 60%, IQR 0%-73%), while the opposite was observed for calcium (median 18%, IQR 0%-27%). Being born outside of Canada was significantly associated with lower total intakes of iron, vitamin D, and calcium (p ≤ 0.01 for all). Consistent positive indicators of supplement use (iron, vitamin D, and calcium) were maternal age over 30 years and holding a university degree. In conclusion, among Canadian women, the probability of having lower iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes is higher among those born outside Canada; supplement intake is a major contributor to total iron and vitamin D intakes; and higher education level and age over 30 years are associated with supplement intake. SN - 1715-5320 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27324651/Rankings_of_iron_vitamin_D_and_calcium_intakes_in_relation_to_maternal_characteristics_of_pregnant_Canadian_women_ L2 - http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/full/10.1139/apnm-2015-0588?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -