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Pubertal Development and Prepubertal Height and Weight Jointly Predict Young Adult Height and Body Mass Index in a Prospective Study in South Africa.
J Nutr. 2016 07; 146(7):1394-401.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Height and adiposity track over childhood, but few studies, to our knowledge, have longitudinally examined the mediating relation of the timing and progression of puberty.

OBJECTIVE

We assessed interrelations between prepubertal height and body mass index, the progression through puberty, and young adult height and adiposity.

METHODS

We analyzed data from the Birth to Twenty Plus study (females, n = 823; males, n = 765). Serial measures of anthropometry and pubertal development were obtained between ages 9 and 16 y. We used latent class growth analysis to categorize pubertal development with respect to pubic hair (females and males), breasts (females), and genitalia (males) development. Adult height and weight were obtained at ages 18 to 20 y.

RESULTS

Among females, higher latent class (earlier initiation and faster progression through puberty) was associated with an increased risk of obesity [pubic hair class 3 compared with class 1: RR, 3.41 (95% CI: 1.57, 7.44)] and inconsistent associations with height. Among males, higher latent class was associated with increased adult height [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: 2.43 cm (95% CI: 0.88, 4.00)] and increased risk of overweight/obesity [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: OR, 3.44 (95% CI: 1.44, 8.20)]. In females, the association with adult height became inverse after adjusting for prepubertal height [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: females, -1.31 cm (95% CI: -2.32, -0.31)]; in males, the association with height was attenuated with this adjustment [-0.56 cm (95% CI: -1.63, 0.52)]. Associations with adiposity were attenuated after adjusting for prepubertal adiposity.

CONCLUSIONS

Progression through puberty modifies the relation between prepubertal and adult anthropometry. Screening for early or rapid progression of puberty might identify children at an increased risk of becoming overweight or obese adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rollins School of Public Health, Hubert Department of Global Health, and Nutrition and Health Sciences Program, Laney Graduate School, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; and Medical Research Council Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit and aryeh.stein@emory.edu.Nutrition and Health Sciences Program, Laney Graduate School, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; and.Rollins School of Public Health, Hubert Department of Global Health, and Nutrition and Health Sciences Program, Laney Graduate School, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; and.Rollins School of Public Health, Hubert Department of Global Health, and Nutrition and Health Sciences Program, Laney Graduate School, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; and.Rollins School of Public Health, Hubert Department of Global Health, and Nutrition and Health Sciences Program, Laney Graduate School, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; and.Medical Research Council Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit and Department of Science and Technology/National Research Foundation, Centre of Excellence of Human Development, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.Medical Research Council Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit and.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27335138

Citation

Stein, Aryeh D., et al. "Pubertal Development and Prepubertal Height and Weight Jointly Predict Young Adult Height and Body Mass Index in a Prospective Study in South Africa." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 146, no. 7, 2016, pp. 1394-401.
Stein AD, Lundeen EA, Martorell R, et al. Pubertal Development and Prepubertal Height and Weight Jointly Predict Young Adult Height and Body Mass Index in a Prospective Study in South Africa. J Nutr. 2016;146(7):1394-401.
Stein, A. D., Lundeen, E. A., Martorell, R., Suchdev, P. S., Mehta, N. K., Richter, L. M., & Norris, S. A. (2016). Pubertal Development and Prepubertal Height and Weight Jointly Predict Young Adult Height and Body Mass Index in a Prospective Study in South Africa. The Journal of Nutrition, 146(7), 1394-401. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.116.231076
Stein AD, et al. Pubertal Development and Prepubertal Height and Weight Jointly Predict Young Adult Height and Body Mass Index in a Prospective Study in South Africa. J Nutr. 2016;146(7):1394-401. PubMed PMID: 27335138.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pubertal Development and Prepubertal Height and Weight Jointly Predict Young Adult Height and Body Mass Index in a Prospective Study in South Africa. AU - Stein,Aryeh D, AU - Lundeen,Elizabeth A, AU - Martorell,Reynaldo, AU - Suchdev,Parminder S, AU - Mehta,Neil K, AU - Richter,Linda M, AU - Norris,Shane A, Y1 - 2016/06/22/ PY - 2016/02/05/received PY - 2016/05/02/accepted PY - 2016/6/24/entrez PY - 2016/6/24/pubmed PY - 2017/6/16/medline KW - Birth to Twenty Plus study KW - adolescence KW - anthropometry KW - human KW - latent class growth analysis KW - longitudinal study KW - puberty SP - 1394 EP - 401 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 146 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Height and adiposity track over childhood, but few studies, to our knowledge, have longitudinally examined the mediating relation of the timing and progression of puberty. OBJECTIVE: We assessed interrelations between prepubertal height and body mass index, the progression through puberty, and young adult height and adiposity. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Birth to Twenty Plus study (females, n = 823; males, n = 765). Serial measures of anthropometry and pubertal development were obtained between ages 9 and 16 y. We used latent class growth analysis to categorize pubertal development with respect to pubic hair (females and males), breasts (females), and genitalia (males) development. Adult height and weight were obtained at ages 18 to 20 y. RESULTS: Among females, higher latent class (earlier initiation and faster progression through puberty) was associated with an increased risk of obesity [pubic hair class 3 compared with class 1: RR, 3.41 (95% CI: 1.57, 7.44)] and inconsistent associations with height. Among males, higher latent class was associated with increased adult height [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: 2.43 cm (95% CI: 0.88, 4.00)] and increased risk of overweight/obesity [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: OR, 3.44 (95% CI: 1.44, 8.20)]. In females, the association with adult height became inverse after adjusting for prepubertal height [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: females, -1.31 cm (95% CI: -2.32, -0.31)]; in males, the association with height was attenuated with this adjustment [-0.56 cm (95% CI: -1.63, 0.52)]. Associations with adiposity were attenuated after adjusting for prepubertal adiposity. CONCLUSIONS: Progression through puberty modifies the relation between prepubertal and adult anthropometry. Screening for early or rapid progression of puberty might identify children at an increased risk of becoming overweight or obese adults. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27335138/Pubertal_Development_and_Prepubertal_Height_and_Weight_Jointly_Predict_Young_Adult_Height_and_Body_Mass_Index_in_a_Prospective_Study_in_South_Africa_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.116.231076 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -