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[Smoking cessation among HIV smokers: Experience of a French hospital-based smoking cessation service].
Encephale. 2017 Apr; 43(2):110-113.E

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

There is a particular need among HIV-infected patients to stop smoking because of the risk of smoking-related complications and the high prevalence of cigarette smoking among them. Only a few studies have focused on this population in real-world settings.

AIM OF THE STUDY

Investigate the effectiveness of a smoking cessation support for HIV-infected patients at the Georges Pompidou University hospital (HEGP) smoking cessation service during the 2011-2012 period.

METHODS

A retrospective study of smoking cessation medical records was performed for 39 smokers who had visited for the first time the HEGP smoking cessation service during the 2011-2012 period and declared to be infected by the HIV on their smoking cessation self-questionnaire. The study has described smokers' characteristics and follow-up to measure the abstinence rate, validated by the patient declaration, the registration of the number of days without cigarettes between each visit and a measure of expired carbon monoxide ≤ 5ppm at each visit. We examined smokers lost to follow-up and they have been considered as smokers. Maintained abstinence rates at 3 month-follow-up and at 9 months/one year were registered.

RESULTS

The 39 HIV-infected smokers registered in the study were mainly male (30/39), were heavy smokers with a consumption mean of nearly 23 cigarettes per day. One third presented high nicotine dependence with a Fagerström test ≥ 7. A depression history was reported among one third of them. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were declared by 20% and 33% respectively among them. Thirteen percent of them received opioid replacement therapies, 41% were cannabis users (one out of four were daily users) and 10 % declared alcohol abuse. 85% of patients received nicotine replacement therapy (patch and/or oral forms) and 15% varenicline®, along with behavioral support techniques. At 3 month-follow-up, smoking cessation was validated for 20.5% of patients and at 9 months/1 year, smoking cessation rate decreased at 13%. When considering smokers with ≥ 2 visits, the maintained abstinence rates were respectively 27.6 and 17.2%.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION

With a severe smoking profile, frequent co-addictions and anxiodepressive symptoms, our results suggest that behavioral techniques combined with nicotine replacement therapy or varenicline® among HIV-infected smokers can help severe smokers to quit. Our data underline the need to take into account the co-addictions and to maintain such patients in treatment to achieve smoking cessation in real-world settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Addictologue, praticien attaché en addictologie, hôpital Antoine Béclère, hôpiaux universitaires Paris Sud, 157, rue de la Porte de Trivaux, 92140 Clamart, France.MCU-PH, AP-HP, centre ambulatoire d'addictologie, hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, pôle psychiatrie-addictologie, hôpitaux universitaires Paris-Ouest, 20, rue Leblanc F, 75015 Paris, France; ECEVE-UMR 1123, université Paris Diderot, site Villemin, 10, rue de Verdun, 75010 Paris, France. Electronic address: anne-laurence.lefaou@aphp.fr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

27339798

Citation

Choulika, S, and A-L Le Faou. "[Smoking Cessation Among HIV Smokers: Experience of a French Hospital-based Smoking Cessation Service]." L'Encephale, vol. 43, no. 2, 2017, pp. 110-113.
Choulika S, Le Faou AL. [Smoking cessation among HIV smokers: Experience of a French hospital-based smoking cessation service]. Encephale. 2017;43(2):110-113.
Choulika, S., & Le Faou, A. L. (2017). [Smoking cessation among HIV smokers: Experience of a French hospital-based smoking cessation service]. L'Encephale, 43(2), 110-113. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.encep.2015.12.026
Choulika S, Le Faou AL. [Smoking Cessation Among HIV Smokers: Experience of a French Hospital-based Smoking Cessation Service]. Encephale. 2017;43(2):110-113. PubMed PMID: 27339798.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Smoking cessation among HIV smokers: Experience of a French hospital-based smoking cessation service]. AU - Choulika,S, AU - Le Faou,A-L, Y1 - 2016/06/20/ PY - 2015/07/18/received PY - 2015/11/30/revised PY - 2015/12/09/accepted PY - 2016/6/25/pubmed PY - 2017/9/29/medline PY - 2016/6/25/entrez KW - Cannabis KW - Fumeurs sévères KW - HIV infection KW - Heavy smokers KW - Infection par le VIH KW - Nicotine replacement therapy KW - Sevrage tabagique KW - Smoking cessation KW - Traitement de substitution nicotinique KW - Varenicline SP - 110 EP - 113 JF - L'Encephale JO - Encephale VL - 43 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: There is a particular need among HIV-infected patients to stop smoking because of the risk of smoking-related complications and the high prevalence of cigarette smoking among them. Only a few studies have focused on this population in real-world settings. AIM OF THE STUDY: Investigate the effectiveness of a smoking cessation support for HIV-infected patients at the Georges Pompidou University hospital (HEGP) smoking cessation service during the 2011-2012 period. METHODS: A retrospective study of smoking cessation medical records was performed for 39 smokers who had visited for the first time the HEGP smoking cessation service during the 2011-2012 period and declared to be infected by the HIV on their smoking cessation self-questionnaire. The study has described smokers' characteristics and follow-up to measure the abstinence rate, validated by the patient declaration, the registration of the number of days without cigarettes between each visit and a measure of expired carbon monoxide ≤ 5ppm at each visit. We examined smokers lost to follow-up and they have been considered as smokers. Maintained abstinence rates at 3 month-follow-up and at 9 months/one year were registered. RESULTS: The 39 HIV-infected smokers registered in the study were mainly male (30/39), were heavy smokers with a consumption mean of nearly 23 cigarettes per day. One third presented high nicotine dependence with a Fagerström test ≥ 7. A depression history was reported among one third of them. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were declared by 20% and 33% respectively among them. Thirteen percent of them received opioid replacement therapies, 41% were cannabis users (one out of four were daily users) and 10 % declared alcohol abuse. 85% of patients received nicotine replacement therapy (patch and/or oral forms) and 15% varenicline®, along with behavioral support techniques. At 3 month-follow-up, smoking cessation was validated for 20.5% of patients and at 9 months/1 year, smoking cessation rate decreased at 13%. When considering smokers with ≥ 2 visits, the maintained abstinence rates were respectively 27.6 and 17.2%. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: With a severe smoking profile, frequent co-addictions and anxiodepressive symptoms, our results suggest that behavioral techniques combined with nicotine replacement therapy or varenicline® among HIV-infected smokers can help severe smokers to quit. Our data underline the need to take into account the co-addictions and to maintain such patients in treatment to achieve smoking cessation in real-world settings. SN - 0013-7006 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27339798/[Smoking_cessation_among_HIV_smokers:_Experience_of_a_French_hospital_based_smoking_cessation_service]_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0013-7006(16)30085-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -