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Mediterranean Diet and Hip Fracture in Swedish Men and Women.
J Bone Miner Res 2016; 31(12):2098-2105JB

Abstract

A Mediterranean diet, known to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health, may also influence the risk of hip fracture although previous studies present discrepant results. We therefore aimed to determine whether the rate of hip fracture was associated with degree of adherence to a Mediterranean diet. We combined two Swedish cohort studies consisting of 37,903 men and 33,403 women (total n = 71,333, mean age 60 years) free of previous cardiovascular disease and cancer who answered a medical and a food-frequency questionnaire in 1997. A modified Mediterranean diet score (mMED; range, 0 to 8 points) was created based on high consumption of fruits and vegetables, legumes and nuts, whole grains, fermented dairy products, fish, and olive/rapeseed oil, moderate intake of alcohol, and low intake of red and processed meat. Incident hip fractures between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2012, were retrieved from the National Patient Register. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for potential confounders were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Differences in age at hip fracture were calculated using multivariable Laplace regression. During follow-up, 3175 hip fractures occurred at a median age of 73.3 years. One unit increase in the mMED was associated with 6% lower hip fracture rate (adjusted HR = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.96) and with a 3-month higher median age at hip fracture (50th percentile difference = 2.8 months; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.2). Comparing the highest quintile of adherence to the mMED (6 to 8 points) with the lowest (0 to 2 points) conferred an adjusted HR of hip fracture of 0.78 (95% CI, 0.69 to 0.89) and a 12-month higher median age of hip fracture (50th percentile difference = 11.6 months; 95% CI, 4.2 to 19.0). Results were similar in men and women. We conclude that higher adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet is associated with lower risk of future hip fracture. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopedics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopedics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27345330

Citation

Byberg, Liisa, et al. "Mediterranean Diet and Hip Fracture in Swedish Men and Women." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 31, no. 12, 2016, pp. 2098-2105.
Byberg L, Bellavia A, Larsson SC, et al. Mediterranean Diet and Hip Fracture in Swedish Men and Women. J Bone Miner Res. 2016;31(12):2098-2105.
Byberg, L., Bellavia, A., Larsson, S. C., Orsini, N., Wolk, A., & Michaëlsson, K. (2016). Mediterranean Diet and Hip Fracture in Swedish Men and Women. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 31(12), pp. 2098-2105. doi:10.1002/jbmr.2896.
Byberg L, et al. Mediterranean Diet and Hip Fracture in Swedish Men and Women. J Bone Miner Res. 2016;31(12):2098-2105. PubMed PMID: 27345330.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mediterranean Diet and Hip Fracture in Swedish Men and Women. AU - Byberg,Liisa, AU - Bellavia,Andrea, AU - Larsson,Susanna C, AU - Orsini,Nicola, AU - Wolk,Alicja, AU - Michaëlsson,Karl, Y1 - 2016/09/08/ PY - 2016/03/29/received PY - 2016/06/10/revised PY - 2016/06/23/accepted PY - 2016/6/28/pubmed PY - 2017/12/19/medline PY - 2016/6/28/entrez KW - COHORT STUDY KW - HIP FRACTURE KW - LAPLACE REGRESSION KW - MEDITERRANEAN DIET KW - NUTRITION SP - 2098 EP - 2105 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J. Bone Miner. Res. VL - 31 IS - 12 N2 - A Mediterranean diet, known to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health, may also influence the risk of hip fracture although previous studies present discrepant results. We therefore aimed to determine whether the rate of hip fracture was associated with degree of adherence to a Mediterranean diet. We combined two Swedish cohort studies consisting of 37,903 men and 33,403 women (total n = 71,333, mean age 60 years) free of previous cardiovascular disease and cancer who answered a medical and a food-frequency questionnaire in 1997. A modified Mediterranean diet score (mMED; range, 0 to 8 points) was created based on high consumption of fruits and vegetables, legumes and nuts, whole grains, fermented dairy products, fish, and olive/rapeseed oil, moderate intake of alcohol, and low intake of red and processed meat. Incident hip fractures between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2012, were retrieved from the National Patient Register. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for potential confounders were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Differences in age at hip fracture were calculated using multivariable Laplace regression. During follow-up, 3175 hip fractures occurred at a median age of 73.3 years. One unit increase in the mMED was associated with 6% lower hip fracture rate (adjusted HR = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.96) and with a 3-month higher median age at hip fracture (50th percentile difference = 2.8 months; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.2). Comparing the highest quintile of adherence to the mMED (6 to 8 points) with the lowest (0 to 2 points) conferred an adjusted HR of hip fracture of 0.78 (95% CI, 0.69 to 0.89) and a 12-month higher median age of hip fracture (50th percentile difference = 11.6 months; 95% CI, 4.2 to 19.0). Results were similar in men and women. We conclude that higher adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet is associated with lower risk of future hip fracture. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. SN - 1523-4681 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27345330/Mediterranean_Diet_and_Hip_Fracture_in_Swedish_Men_and_Women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.2896 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -