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Prevalence of delayed-type and immediate-type hypersensitivity in healthcare workers with hand eczema.
Contact Dermatitis 2016; 75(4):223-9CD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Occupational contact dermatitis is common in healthcare workers. Although irritant contact dermatitis resulting from wet work is the most frequently reported cause, healthcare workers also constitute high-risk group for the development of allergic contact dermatitis and contact urticaria.

OBJECTIVES

To evaluate the prevalence of delayed-type and immediate-type hypersensitivity in 120 healthcare workers with hand eczema.

METHODS

One hundred and twenty healthcare workers from three major hospitals in Denmark with self-reported hand eczema within the last year participated in the study. Patch tests included baseline series plus selected allergens, and prick tests included standard inhalational allergens plus natural rubber latex and chlorhexidine. Levels of IgE specific for latex, chlorhexidine and ethylene oxide were measured.

RESULTS

Of the participants, 53% had positive patch test reactions. The most frequent positive patch test reactions were to nickel, thiomersal, fragrances, rubber chemicals, and colophonium. The prevalence of natural rubber latex allergy as diagnosed by prick testing was 2.5%, and chlorhexidine allergy (both contact allergy and IgE-mediated allergy) was found in <1%. Ethylene oxide allergy was not identified in any of the participants.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results confirm previous reports on contact allergy patterns in healthcare workers. Testing for natural rubber latex allergy is still important, but increased risks of chlorhexidine and ethylene oxide allergy could not be confirmed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. ksi@regionsjaelland.dk. Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2400 Copenhagen, Denmark. ksi@regionsjaelland.dk.Department of Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark.Allergy Clinic, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark.Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2400 Copenhagen, Denmark.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27352907

Citation

Ibler, Kristina S., et al. "Prevalence of Delayed-type and Immediate-type Hypersensitivity in Healthcare Workers With Hand Eczema." Contact Dermatitis, vol. 75, no. 4, 2016, pp. 223-9.
Ibler KS, Jemec GB, Garvey LH, et al. Prevalence of delayed-type and immediate-type hypersensitivity in healthcare workers with hand eczema. Contact Derm. 2016;75(4):223-9.
Ibler, K. S., Jemec, G. B., Garvey, L. H., & Agner, T. (2016). Prevalence of delayed-type and immediate-type hypersensitivity in healthcare workers with hand eczema. Contact Dermatitis, 75(4), pp. 223-9. doi:10.1111/cod.12587.
Ibler KS, et al. Prevalence of Delayed-type and Immediate-type Hypersensitivity in Healthcare Workers With Hand Eczema. Contact Derm. 2016;75(4):223-9. PubMed PMID: 27352907.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of delayed-type and immediate-type hypersensitivity in healthcare workers with hand eczema. AU - Ibler,Kristina S, AU - Jemec,Gregor B E, AU - Garvey,Lene H, AU - Agner,Tove, Y1 - 2016/06/28/ PY - 2015/12/21/received PY - 2016/03/06/revised PY - 2016/03/07/accepted PY - 2016/6/30/entrez PY - 2016/6/30/pubmed PY - 2017/4/26/medline KW - IgE-mediated allergy KW - contact allergy KW - hand eczema KW - healthcare workers SP - 223 EP - 9 JF - Contact dermatitis JO - Contact Derm. VL - 75 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Occupational contact dermatitis is common in healthcare workers. Although irritant contact dermatitis resulting from wet work is the most frequently reported cause, healthcare workers also constitute high-risk group for the development of allergic contact dermatitis and contact urticaria. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of delayed-type and immediate-type hypersensitivity in 120 healthcare workers with hand eczema. METHODS: One hundred and twenty healthcare workers from three major hospitals in Denmark with self-reported hand eczema within the last year participated in the study. Patch tests included baseline series plus selected allergens, and prick tests included standard inhalational allergens plus natural rubber latex and chlorhexidine. Levels of IgE specific for latex, chlorhexidine and ethylene oxide were measured. RESULTS: Of the participants, 53% had positive patch test reactions. The most frequent positive patch test reactions were to nickel, thiomersal, fragrances, rubber chemicals, and colophonium. The prevalence of natural rubber latex allergy as diagnosed by prick testing was 2.5%, and chlorhexidine allergy (both contact allergy and IgE-mediated allergy) was found in <1%. Ethylene oxide allergy was not identified in any of the participants. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm previous reports on contact allergy patterns in healthcare workers. Testing for natural rubber latex allergy is still important, but increased risks of chlorhexidine and ethylene oxide allergy could not be confirmed. SN - 1600-0536 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27352907/Prevalence_of_delayed_type_and_immediate_type_hypersensitivity_in_healthcare_workers_with_hand_eczema_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/cod.12587 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -