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Micronutrient intake and food sources in the very old: analysis of the Newcastle 85+ Study.
Br J Nutr. 2016 08; 116(4):751-61.BJ

Abstract

A number of socio-economic, biological and lifestyle characteristics change with advancing age and place very old adults at increased risk of micronutrient deficiencies. The aim of this study was to assess vitamin and mineral intakes and respective food sources in 793 75-year-olds (302 men and 491 women) in the North-East of England, participating in the Newcastle 85+ Study. Micronutrient intakes were estimated using a multiple-pass recall tool (2×24 h recalls). Determinants of micronutrient intake were assessed with multinomial logistic regression. Median vitamin D, Ca and Mg intakes were 2·0 (interquartile range (IQR) 1·2-6·5) µg/d, 731 (IQR 554-916) mg/d and 215 (IQR 166-266) mg/d, respectively. Fe intake was 8·7 (IQR 6·7-11·6) mg/d, and Se intake was 39·0 (IQR 27·3-55·5) µg/d. Cereals and cereal products were the top contributors to intakes of folate (31·5 %), Fe (49·2 %) and Se (46·7 %) and the second highest contributors to intakes of vitamin D (23·8 %), Ca (27·5 %) and K (15·8 %). More than 95 % (n 756) of the participants had vitamin D intakes below the UK's Reference Nutrient Intake (10 µg/d). In all, >20 % of the participants were below the Lower Reference Nutrient Intake for Mg (n 175), K (n 238) and Se (n 418) (comparisons with dietary reference values (DRV) do not include supplements). As most DRV are not age specific and have been extrapolated from younger populations, results should be interpreted with caution. Participants with higher education, from higher social class and who were more physically active had more nutrient-dense diets. More studies are needed to inform the development of age-specific DRV for micronutrients for the very old.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE1 7RU,UK.1School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE1 7RU,UK.2Newcastle University Institute for Ageing,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE2 4AX,UK.2Newcastle University Institute for Ageing,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE2 4AX,UK.2Newcastle University Institute for Ageing,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE2 4AX,UK.2Newcastle University Institute for Ageing,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE2 4AX,UK.2Newcastle University Institute for Ageing,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE2 4AX,UK.3Human Nutrition Research Centre,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE2 4HH,UK.1School of Agriculture Food and Rural Development,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE1 7RU,UK.2Newcastle University Institute for Ageing,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE2 4AX,UK.2Newcastle University Institute for Ageing,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE2 4AX,UK.2Newcastle University Institute for Ageing,Newcastle University,Newcastle upon TyneNE2 4AX,UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27363567

Citation

Mendonça, Nuno, et al. "Micronutrient Intake and Food Sources in the Very Old: Analysis of the Newcastle 85+ Study." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 116, no. 4, 2016, pp. 751-61.
Mendonça N, Hill TR, Granic A, et al. Micronutrient intake and food sources in the very old: analysis of the Newcastle 85+ Study. Br J Nutr. 2016;116(4):751-61.
Mendonça, N., Hill, T. R., Granic, A., Davies, K., Collerton, J., Mathers, J. C., Siervo, M., Wrieden, W. L., Seal, C. J., Kirkwood, T. B., Jagger, C., & Adamson, A. J. (2016). Micronutrient intake and food sources in the very old: analysis of the Newcastle 85+ Study. The British Journal of Nutrition, 116(4), 751-61. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114516002567
Mendonça N, et al. Micronutrient Intake and Food Sources in the Very Old: Analysis of the Newcastle 85+ Study. Br J Nutr. 2016;116(4):751-61. PubMed PMID: 27363567.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Micronutrient intake and food sources in the very old: analysis of the Newcastle 85+ Study. AU - Mendonça,Nuno, AU - Hill,Tom R, AU - Granic,Antoneta, AU - Davies,Karen, AU - Collerton,Joanna, AU - Mathers,John C, AU - Siervo,Mario, AU - Wrieden,Wendy L, AU - Seal,Chris J, AU - Kirkwood,Thomas B L, AU - Jagger,Carol, AU - Adamson,Ashley J, Y1 - 2016/07/01/ PY - 2016/7/2/entrez PY - 2016/7/2/pubmed PY - 2017/5/24/medline KW - 24 h-MPR 24-h multiple-pass recall KW - Aged 80 years and over KW - CCP cereals and cereal products KW - DRV dietary reference value KW - Dietary intakes KW - IQR interquartile ranges KW - LRNI Lower Reference Nutrient Intake KW - Minerals KW - NDNS National Diet and Nutrition Survey KW - Newcastle 85+ Study KW - RNI Reference Nutrient Intake KW - Vitamins SP - 751 EP - 61 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 116 IS - 4 N2 - A number of socio-economic, biological and lifestyle characteristics change with advancing age and place very old adults at increased risk of micronutrient deficiencies. The aim of this study was to assess vitamin and mineral intakes and respective food sources in 793 75-year-olds (302 men and 491 women) in the North-East of England, participating in the Newcastle 85+ Study. Micronutrient intakes were estimated using a multiple-pass recall tool (2×24 h recalls). Determinants of micronutrient intake were assessed with multinomial logistic regression. Median vitamin D, Ca and Mg intakes were 2·0 (interquartile range (IQR) 1·2-6·5) µg/d, 731 (IQR 554-916) mg/d and 215 (IQR 166-266) mg/d, respectively. Fe intake was 8·7 (IQR 6·7-11·6) mg/d, and Se intake was 39·0 (IQR 27·3-55·5) µg/d. Cereals and cereal products were the top contributors to intakes of folate (31·5 %), Fe (49·2 %) and Se (46·7 %) and the second highest contributors to intakes of vitamin D (23·8 %), Ca (27·5 %) and K (15·8 %). More than 95 % (n 756) of the participants had vitamin D intakes below the UK's Reference Nutrient Intake (10 µg/d). In all, >20 % of the participants were below the Lower Reference Nutrient Intake for Mg (n 175), K (n 238) and Se (n 418) (comparisons with dietary reference values (DRV) do not include supplements). As most DRV are not age specific and have been extrapolated from younger populations, results should be interpreted with caution. Participants with higher education, from higher social class and who were more physically active had more nutrient-dense diets. More studies are needed to inform the development of age-specific DRV for micronutrients for the very old. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27363567/Micronutrient_intake_and_food_sources_in_the_very_old:_analysis_of_the_Newcastle_85+_Study_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114516002567/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -