Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Adverse event reports following yellow fever vaccination, 2007-13.
J Travel Med. 2016 May; 23(5)JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Yellow fever (YF) vaccines have been available since the 1930s and are generally considered safe and effective. However, rare reports of serious adverse events (SAE) following vaccination have prompted the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices to periodically expand the list of conditions considered contraindications and precautions to vaccination.

METHODS

We describe adverse events following YF vaccination reported to the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) from 2007 through 2013 and calculate age- and sex-specific reporting rates of all SAE, anaphylaxis, YF vaccine-associated neurologic disease (YEL-AND) and YF vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD).

RESULTS

There were 938 adverse events following YF vaccination reported to VAERS from 2007 through 2013. Of these, 84 (9%) were classified as SAEs for a rate of 3.8 per 100 000 doses distributed. Reporting rates of SAEs increased with increasing age with a rate of 6.5 per 100 000 in persons aged 60-69 years and 10.3 for ≥70 years. The reporting rate for anaphylaxis was 1.3 per 100 000 doses distributed and was highest in persons ≤18 years (2.7 per 100 000). Reporting rates of YEL-AND and YEL-AVD were 0.8 and 0.3 per 100 000 doses distributed, respectively; both rates increased with increasing age.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings reinforce the generally acceptable safety profile of YF vaccine, but highlight the importance of continued physician and traveller education regarding the risks and benefits of YF vaccination, particularly for older travellers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Arboviral Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3156 Rampart Road, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA.Arboviral Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3156 Rampart Road, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA.Immunization Safety Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.Arboviral Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3156 Rampart Road, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA.Arboviral Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3156 Rampart Road, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27378369

Citation

Lindsey, Nicole P., et al. "Adverse Event Reports Following Yellow Fever Vaccination, 2007-13." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 23, no. 5, 2016.
Lindsey NP, Rabe IB, Miller ER, et al. Adverse event reports following yellow fever vaccination, 2007-13. J Travel Med. 2016;23(5).
Lindsey, N. P., Rabe, I. B., Miller, E. R., Fischer, M., & Staples, J. E. (2016). Adverse event reports following yellow fever vaccination, 2007-13. Journal of Travel Medicine, 23(5). https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taw045
Lindsey NP, et al. Adverse Event Reports Following Yellow Fever Vaccination, 2007-13. J Travel Med. 2016;23(5) PubMed PMID: 27378369.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adverse event reports following yellow fever vaccination, 2007-13. AU - Lindsey,Nicole P, AU - Rabe,Ingrid B, AU - Miller,Elaine R, AU - Fischer,Marc, AU - Staples,J Erin, Y1 - 2016/07/04/ PY - 2015/12/21/received PY - 2016/06/09/accepted PY - 2016/7/6/entrez PY - 2016/7/6/pubmed PY - 2017/3/16/medline KW - VAERS KW - Yellow fever KW - adverse event KW - vaccine JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Yellow fever (YF) vaccines have been available since the 1930s and are generally considered safe and effective. However, rare reports of serious adverse events (SAE) following vaccination have prompted the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices to periodically expand the list of conditions considered contraindications and precautions to vaccination. METHODS: We describe adverse events following YF vaccination reported to the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) from 2007 through 2013 and calculate age- and sex-specific reporting rates of all SAE, anaphylaxis, YF vaccine-associated neurologic disease (YEL-AND) and YF vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD). RESULTS: There were 938 adverse events following YF vaccination reported to VAERS from 2007 through 2013. Of these, 84 (9%) were classified as SAEs for a rate of 3.8 per 100 000 doses distributed. Reporting rates of SAEs increased with increasing age with a rate of 6.5 per 100 000 in persons aged 60-69 years and 10.3 for ≥70 years. The reporting rate for anaphylaxis was 1.3 per 100 000 doses distributed and was highest in persons ≤18 years (2.7 per 100 000). Reporting rates of YEL-AND and YEL-AVD were 0.8 and 0.3 per 100 000 doses distributed, respectively; both rates increased with increasing age. CONCLUSIONS: These findings reinforce the generally acceptable safety profile of YF vaccine, but highlight the importance of continued physician and traveller education regarding the risks and benefits of YF vaccination, particularly for older travellers. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27378369/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jtm/taw045 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -