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Post-exposure treatment with whole inactivated H5N1 avian influenza virus protects against lethal homologous virus infection in mice.
Sci Rep. 2016 07 12; 6:29433.SR

Abstract

Concerns with H5N1 influenza viruses include their prevalence in wild and domestic poultry, high mortality rate (~60%) in humans with some strains, lack of pre-existing immunity in humans, and the possibility that these viruses acquire mutations that enable efficient transmission between humans. H5 subtype viruses of Eurasian origin have recently appeared in wild and domestic bird populations in North America, and have led to the generation of new virus strains that are highly pathogenic in poultry. These new H5 HA containing viruses with their ability to evolve rapidly represent an unknown threat to humans in contact with infected poultry, and vaccination with an off-the-shelf vaccine may be impractical to provide protection to at-risk individuals. Instead, we have evaluated the efficacy of a formalin-inactivated vaccine, which could be derived directly from a circulating virus, to provide post-exposure protection. This strategy was evaluated using a prototypic highly pathogenic avian H5N1 strain, A/Vietnam/1203/2004, and demonstrated rapid induction of adaptive immune responses providing protection in a mammalian model of lethal infection. Additionally, this post-exposure vaccine was highly efficacious when administered 24 hours after exposure. This study offers a platform for developing effective post-exposure vaccines for treatment of highly virulent influenza infections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. High Containment Respiratory Viruses, Special Pathogens Program, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.High Containment Respiratory Viruses, Special Pathogens Program, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. High Containment Respiratory Viruses, Special Pathogens Program, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.Département des Technologies de laboratoire, Cégep de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.High Containment Respiratory Viruses, Special Pathogens Program, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. High Containment Respiratory Viruses, Special Pathogens Program, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27405487

Citation

Hagan, Mable, et al. "Post-exposure Treatment With Whole Inactivated H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Protects Against Lethal Homologous Virus Infection in Mice." Scientific Reports, vol. 6, 2016, p. 29433.
Hagan M, Ranadheera C, Audet J, et al. Post-exposure treatment with whole inactivated H5N1 avian influenza virus protects against lethal homologous virus infection in mice. Sci Rep. 2016;6:29433.
Hagan, M., Ranadheera, C., Audet, J., Morin, J., Leung, A., & Kobasa, D. (2016). Post-exposure treatment with whole inactivated H5N1 avian influenza virus protects against lethal homologous virus infection in mice. Scientific Reports, 6, 29433. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep29433
Hagan M, et al. Post-exposure Treatment With Whole Inactivated H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Protects Against Lethal Homologous Virus Infection in Mice. Sci Rep. 2016 07 12;6:29433. PubMed PMID: 27405487.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Post-exposure treatment with whole inactivated H5N1 avian influenza virus protects against lethal homologous virus infection in mice. AU - Hagan,Mable, AU - Ranadheera,Charlene, AU - Audet,Jonathan, AU - Morin,Jocelyn, AU - Leung,Anders, AU - Kobasa,Darwyn, Y1 - 2016/07/12/ PY - 2016/04/11/received PY - 2016/06/14/accepted PY - 2016/7/14/entrez PY - 2016/7/14/pubmed PY - 2018/7/11/medline SP - 29433 EP - 29433 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 6 N2 - Concerns with H5N1 influenza viruses include their prevalence in wild and domestic poultry, high mortality rate (~60%) in humans with some strains, lack of pre-existing immunity in humans, and the possibility that these viruses acquire mutations that enable efficient transmission between humans. H5 subtype viruses of Eurasian origin have recently appeared in wild and domestic bird populations in North America, and have led to the generation of new virus strains that are highly pathogenic in poultry. These new H5 HA containing viruses with their ability to evolve rapidly represent an unknown threat to humans in contact with infected poultry, and vaccination with an off-the-shelf vaccine may be impractical to provide protection to at-risk individuals. Instead, we have evaluated the efficacy of a formalin-inactivated vaccine, which could be derived directly from a circulating virus, to provide post-exposure protection. This strategy was evaluated using a prototypic highly pathogenic avian H5N1 strain, A/Vietnam/1203/2004, and demonstrated rapid induction of adaptive immune responses providing protection in a mammalian model of lethal infection. Additionally, this post-exposure vaccine was highly efficacious when administered 24 hours after exposure. This study offers a platform for developing effective post-exposure vaccines for treatment of highly virulent influenza infections. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27405487/Post_exposure_treatment_with_whole_inactivated_H5N1_avian_influenza_virus_protects_against_lethal_homologous_virus_infection_in_mice_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -