Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Concurrent beneficial (vitamin D production) and hazardous (cutaneous DNA damage) impact of repeated low-level summer sunlight exposures.
Br J Dermatol. 2016 Dec; 175(6):1320-1328.BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The concurrent impact of repeated low-level summer sunlight exposures on vitamin D production and cutaneous DNA damage, potentially leading to mutagenesis and skin cancer, is unknown.

OBJECTIVES

This is an experimental study (i) to determine the dual impact of repeated low-level sunlight exposures on vitamin D status and DNA damage/repair (via both skin and urinary biomarkers) in light-skinned adults; and (ii) to compare outcomes following the same exposures in brown-skinned adults.

METHODS

Ten white (phototype II) and six South Asian volunteers (phototype V), aged 23-59 years, received 6 weeks' simulated summer sunlight exposures (95% ultraviolet A/5% ultraviolet B, 1·3 standard erythemal doses three times weekly) wearing summer clothing exposing ~35% body surface area. Assessments made were circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], immunohistochemistry for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD)-positive nuclei and urinary biomarkers of direct and oxidative (8-oxo-deoxyguanosine) DNA damage.

RESULTS

Serum 25(OH)D rose from mean 36·5 ± 13·0 to 54·3 ± 10·5 nmol L-1 (14·6 ± 5·2 to 21·7 ± 4·2 ng mL-1) in phototype II vs. 17·2 ± 6·3 to 25·5 ± 9·5 nmol L-1 (6·9 ± 2·5 to 10·2 ± 3·8 ng mL-1) in phototype V (P < 0·05). Phototype II skin showed CPD-positive nuclei immediately postcourse, mean 44% (range 27-84) cleared after 24 h, contrasting with minimal DNA damage and full clearance in phototype V (P < 0·001). The findings did not differ from those following single ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. Urinary CPDs remained below the detection threshold in both groups; 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine was higher in phototype II than V (P = 0·002), but was unaffected by UVR.

CONCLUSIONS

Low-dose summer sunlight exposures confer vitamin D sufficiency in light-skinned people concurrently with low-level, nonaccumulating DNA damage. The same exposures produce minimal DNA damage but less vitamin D in brown-skinned people. This informs tailoring of sun-exposure policies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dermatology Research Centre, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, U.K.Oxidative Stress Group, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Florida International University, Miami, FL, U.S.A.School of Earth Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, U.K.Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Oxford Road, Manchester, U.K.School of Earth Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, U.K.Oxidative Stress Group, Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University of Leicester, Leicester, U.K.Department of Dermatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands.Centre for Biostatistics, Institute of Population Health, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, U.K.Dermatology Research Centre, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, U.K.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27411377

Citation

Felton, S J., et al. "Concurrent Beneficial (vitamin D Production) and Hazardous (cutaneous DNA Damage) Impact of Repeated Low-level Summer Sunlight Exposures." The British Journal of Dermatology, vol. 175, no. 6, 2016, pp. 1320-1328.
Felton SJ, Cooke MS, Kift R, et al. Concurrent beneficial (vitamin D production) and hazardous (cutaneous DNA damage) impact of repeated low-level summer sunlight exposures. Br J Dermatol. 2016;175(6):1320-1328.
Felton, S. J., Cooke, M. S., Kift, R., Berry, J. L., Webb, A. R., Lam, P. M., de Gruijl, F. R., Vail, A., & Rhodes, L. E. (2016). Concurrent beneficial (vitamin D production) and hazardous (cutaneous DNA damage) impact of repeated low-level summer sunlight exposures. The British Journal of Dermatology, 175(6), 1320-1328. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.14863
Felton SJ, et al. Concurrent Beneficial (vitamin D Production) and Hazardous (cutaneous DNA Damage) Impact of Repeated Low-level Summer Sunlight Exposures. Br J Dermatol. 2016;175(6):1320-1328. PubMed PMID: 27411377.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Concurrent beneficial (vitamin D production) and hazardous (cutaneous DNA damage) impact of repeated low-level summer sunlight exposures. AU - Felton,S J, AU - Cooke,M S, AU - Kift,R, AU - Berry,J L, AU - Webb,A R, AU - Lam,P M W, AU - de Gruijl,F R, AU - Vail,A, AU - Rhodes,L E, Y1 - 2016/11/18/ PY - 2016/07/08/accepted PY - 2016/7/15/pubmed PY - 2017/9/19/medline PY - 2016/7/15/entrez SP - 1320 EP - 1328 JF - The British journal of dermatology JO - Br J Dermatol VL - 175 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The concurrent impact of repeated low-level summer sunlight exposures on vitamin D production and cutaneous DNA damage, potentially leading to mutagenesis and skin cancer, is unknown. OBJECTIVES: This is an experimental study (i) to determine the dual impact of repeated low-level sunlight exposures on vitamin D status and DNA damage/repair (via both skin and urinary biomarkers) in light-skinned adults; and (ii) to compare outcomes following the same exposures in brown-skinned adults. METHODS: Ten white (phototype II) and six South Asian volunteers (phototype V), aged 23-59 years, received 6 weeks' simulated summer sunlight exposures (95% ultraviolet A/5% ultraviolet B, 1·3 standard erythemal doses three times weekly) wearing summer clothing exposing ~35% body surface area. Assessments made were circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], immunohistochemistry for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD)-positive nuclei and urinary biomarkers of direct and oxidative (8-oxo-deoxyguanosine) DNA damage. RESULTS: Serum 25(OH)D rose from mean 36·5 ± 13·0 to 54·3 ± 10·5 nmol L-1 (14·6 ± 5·2 to 21·7 ± 4·2 ng mL-1) in phototype II vs. 17·2 ± 6·3 to 25·5 ± 9·5 nmol L-1 (6·9 ± 2·5 to 10·2 ± 3·8 ng mL-1) in phototype V (P < 0·05). Phototype II skin showed CPD-positive nuclei immediately postcourse, mean 44% (range 27-84) cleared after 24 h, contrasting with minimal DNA damage and full clearance in phototype V (P < 0·001). The findings did not differ from those following single ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. Urinary CPDs remained below the detection threshold in both groups; 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine was higher in phototype II than V (P = 0·002), but was unaffected by UVR. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose summer sunlight exposures confer vitamin D sufficiency in light-skinned people concurrently with low-level, nonaccumulating DNA damage. The same exposures produce minimal DNA damage but less vitamin D in brown-skinned people. This informs tailoring of sun-exposure policies. SN - 1365-2133 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27411377/Concurrent_beneficial__vitamin_D_production__and_hazardous__cutaneous_DNA_damage__impact_of_repeated_low_level_summer_sunlight_exposures_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.14863 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -