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Impact of Cranberries on Gut Microbiota and Cardiometabolic Health: Proceedings of the Cranberry Health Research Conference 2015.

Abstract

Recent advances in cranberry research have expanded the evidence for the role of this Vaccinium berry fruit in modulating gut microbiota function and cardiometabolic risk factors. The A-type structure of cranberry proanthocyanidins seems to be responsible for much of this fruit's efficacy as a natural antimicrobial. Cranberry proanthocyanidins interfere with colonization of the gut by extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli in vitro and attenuate gut barrier dysfunction caused by dietary insults in vivo. Furthermore, new studies indicate synergy between these proanthocyanidins, other cranberry components such as isoprenoids and xyloglucans, and gut microbiota. Together, cranberry constituents and their bioactive catabolites have been found to contribute to mechanisms affecting bacterial adhesion, coaggregation, and biofilm formation that may underlie potential clinical benefits on gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections, as well as on systemic anti-inflammatory actions mediated via the gut microbiome. A limited but growing body of evidence from randomized clinical trials reveals favorable effects of cranberry consumption on measures of cardiometabolic health, including serum lipid profiles, blood pressure, endothelial function, glucoregulation, and a variety of biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress. These results warrant further research, particularly studies dedicated to the elucidation of dose-response relations, pharmacokinetic/metabolomics profiles, and relevant biomarkers of action with the use of fully characterized cranberry products. Freeze-dried whole cranberry powder and a matched placebo were recently made available to investigators to facilitate such work, including interlaboratory comparability.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA; jeffrey.blumberg@tufts.edu.

    ,

    Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK;

    ,

    Complete Phytochemical Solutions, LLC, Cambridge, WI; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI;

    ,

    North Carolina State University, Kannapolis, NC;

    ,

    University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, Dartmouth, MA;

    ,

    USDA Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, Beltsville, MD;

    ,

    Complete Phytochemical Solutions, LLC, Cambridge, WI; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI;

    ,

    University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany;

    The Cranberry Institute, Carver, MA; and CDT Consulting, LLC, Herndon, VA.

    Source

    MeSH

    Animals
    Anti-Infective Agents
    Biofilms
    Diet
    Fruit
    Gastrointestinal Microbiome
    Health Promotion
    Heart Diseases
    Humans
    Inflammation
    Lipids
    Metabolic Diseases
    Oxidative Stress
    Phytochemicals
    Plant Extracts
    Proanthocyanidins
    Risk Factors
    Vaccinium macrocarpon

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27422512

    Citation

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B., et al. "Impact of Cranberries On Gut Microbiota and Cardiometabolic Health: Proceedings of the Cranberry Health Research Conference 2015." Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.), vol. 7, no. 4, 2016, 759S-70S.
    Blumberg JB, Basu A, Krueger CG, et al. Impact of Cranberries on Gut Microbiota and Cardiometabolic Health: Proceedings of the Cranberry Health Research Conference 2015. Adv Nutr. 2016;7(4):759S-70S.
    Blumberg, J. B., Basu, A., Krueger, C. G., Lila, M. A., Neto, C. C., Novotny, J. A., ... Toner, C. D. (2016). Impact of Cranberries on Gut Microbiota and Cardiometabolic Health: Proceedings of the Cranberry Health Research Conference 2015. Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.), 7(4), 759S-70S. doi:10.3945/an.116.012583.
    Blumberg JB, et al. Impact of Cranberries On Gut Microbiota and Cardiometabolic Health: Proceedings of the Cranberry Health Research Conference 2015. Adv Nutr. 2016;7(4):759S-70S. PubMed PMID: 27422512.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of Cranberries on Gut Microbiota and Cardiometabolic Health: Proceedings of the Cranberry Health Research Conference 2015. AU - Blumberg,Jeffrey B, AU - Basu,Arpita, AU - Krueger,Christian G, AU - Lila,Mary Ann, AU - Neto,Catherine C, AU - Novotny,Janet A, AU - Reed,Jess D, AU - Rodriguez-Mateos,Ana, AU - Toner,Cheryl D, Y1 - 2016/07/15/ PY - 2016/7/17/entrez PY - 2016/7/17/pubmed PY - 2018/1/19/medline KW - antimicrobial KW - cardiometabolic KW - cranberry KW - microbiome KW - proanthocyanidins SP - 759S EP - 70S JF - Advances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.) JO - Adv Nutr VL - 7 IS - 4 N2 - Recent advances in cranberry research have expanded the evidence for the role of this Vaccinium berry fruit in modulating gut microbiota function and cardiometabolic risk factors. The A-type structure of cranberry proanthocyanidins seems to be responsible for much of this fruit's efficacy as a natural antimicrobial. Cranberry proanthocyanidins interfere with colonization of the gut by extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli in vitro and attenuate gut barrier dysfunction caused by dietary insults in vivo. Furthermore, new studies indicate synergy between these proanthocyanidins, other cranberry components such as isoprenoids and xyloglucans, and gut microbiota. Together, cranberry constituents and their bioactive catabolites have been found to contribute to mechanisms affecting bacterial adhesion, coaggregation, and biofilm formation that may underlie potential clinical benefits on gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections, as well as on systemic anti-inflammatory actions mediated via the gut microbiome. A limited but growing body of evidence from randomized clinical trials reveals favorable effects of cranberry consumption on measures of cardiometabolic health, including serum lipid profiles, blood pressure, endothelial function, glucoregulation, and a variety of biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress. These results warrant further research, particularly studies dedicated to the elucidation of dose-response relations, pharmacokinetic/metabolomics profiles, and relevant biomarkers of action with the use of fully characterized cranberry products. Freeze-dried whole cranberry powder and a matched placebo were recently made available to investigators to facilitate such work, including interlaboratory comparability. SN - 2156-5376 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27422512/Impact_of_Cranberries_on_Gut_Microbiota_and_Cardiometabolic_Health:_Proceedings_of_the_Cranberry_Health_Research_Conference_2015_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/advances/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/an.116.012583 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -