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Adverse events following pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent and seasonal influenza vaccinations during the 2009-2010 season in the active component U.S. military and civilians aged 17-44years reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.
Vaccine. 2016 08 17; 34(37):4406-14.V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

No comparative review of Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) submissions following pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal influenza vaccinations during the pandemic season among U.S. military personnel has been published.

METHODS

We compared military vs. civilian adverse event reporting rates. Adverse events (AEs) following vaccination were identified from VAERS for adults aged 17-44years after pandemic (monovalent influenza [MIV], and seasonal (trivalent inactivated influenza [IIV3], live attenuated influenza [LAIV3]) vaccines. Military vaccination coverage was provided by the Department of Defense's Defense Medical Surveillance System. Civilian vaccination coverage was estimated using data from the National 2009 H1N1 Flu Survey and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey.

RESULTS

Vaccination coverage was more than four times higher for MIV and more than twenty times higher for LAIV3 in the military than in the civilian population. The reporting rate of serious AE reports following MIV in service personnel (1.19 per 100,000) was about half that reported by the civilian population (2.45 per 100,000). Conversely, the rate of serious AE reports following LAIV3 among service personnel (1.32 per 100,000) was more than twice that of the civilian population. Although fewer military AEs following MIV were reported overall, the rate of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) (4.01 per million) was four times greater than that in the civilian population. (1.04 per million).

CONCLUSIONS

Despite higher vaccination coverage in service personnel, the rate of serious AEs following MIV was about half that in civilians. The rate of GBS reported following MIV was higher in the military.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Immunization Safety Office, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States.Immunization Safety Office, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States.Immunization Healthcare Branch, Defense Health Agency, (including legacy Vaccine Healthcare Centers Network, Public Health Command), Walter Reed National Military Medical Center America, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MA 20889-0001, United States.Immunization Safety Office, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States. Electronic address: mmm2@cdc.gov.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27449076

Citation

Bardenheier, Barbara H., et al. "Adverse Events Following Pandemic Influenza a (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent and Seasonal Influenza Vaccinations During the 2009-2010 Season in the Active Component U.S. Military and Civilians Aged 17-44years Reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System." Vaccine, vol. 34, no. 37, 2016, pp. 4406-14.
Bardenheier BH, Duderstadt SK, Engler RJ, et al. Adverse events following pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent and seasonal influenza vaccinations during the 2009-2010 season in the active component U.S. military and civilians aged 17-44years reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Vaccine. 2016;34(37):4406-14.
Bardenheier, B. H., Duderstadt, S. K., Engler, R. J., & McNeil, M. M. (2016). Adverse events following pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent and seasonal influenza vaccinations during the 2009-2010 season in the active component U.S. military and civilians aged 17-44years reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Vaccine, 34(37), 4406-14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.07.019
Bardenheier BH, et al. Adverse Events Following Pandemic Influenza a (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent and Seasonal Influenza Vaccinations During the 2009-2010 Season in the Active Component U.S. Military and Civilians Aged 17-44years Reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Vaccine. 2016 08 17;34(37):4406-14. PubMed PMID: 27449076.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adverse events following pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent and seasonal influenza vaccinations during the 2009-2010 season in the active component U.S. military and civilians aged 17-44years reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. AU - Bardenheier,Barbara H, AU - Duderstadt,Susan K, AU - Engler,Renata J M, AU - McNeil,Michael M, Y1 - 2016/07/19/ PY - 2016/05/31/received PY - 2016/07/05/revised PY - 2016/07/12/accepted PY - 2016/7/25/entrez PY - 2016/7/28/pubmed PY - 2017/11/7/medline KW - Pandemic influenza A H1N1 (2009) influenza vaccine KW - Vaccine safety SP - 4406 EP - 14 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 34 IS - 37 N2 - BACKGROUND: No comparative review of Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) submissions following pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal influenza vaccinations during the pandemic season among U.S. military personnel has been published. METHODS: We compared military vs. civilian adverse event reporting rates. Adverse events (AEs) following vaccination were identified from VAERS for adults aged 17-44years after pandemic (monovalent influenza [MIV], and seasonal (trivalent inactivated influenza [IIV3], live attenuated influenza [LAIV3]) vaccines. Military vaccination coverage was provided by the Department of Defense's Defense Medical Surveillance System. Civilian vaccination coverage was estimated using data from the National 2009 H1N1 Flu Survey and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. RESULTS: Vaccination coverage was more than four times higher for MIV and more than twenty times higher for LAIV3 in the military than in the civilian population. The reporting rate of serious AE reports following MIV in service personnel (1.19 per 100,000) was about half that reported by the civilian population (2.45 per 100,000). Conversely, the rate of serious AE reports following LAIV3 among service personnel (1.32 per 100,000) was more than twice that of the civilian population. Although fewer military AEs following MIV were reported overall, the rate of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) (4.01 per million) was four times greater than that in the civilian population. (1.04 per million). CONCLUSIONS: Despite higher vaccination coverage in service personnel, the rate of serious AEs following MIV was about half that in civilians. The rate of GBS reported following MIV was higher in the military. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27449076/Adverse_events_following_pandemic_influenza_A__H1N1__2009_monovalent_and_seasonal_influenza_vaccinations_during_the_2009_2010_season_in_the_active_component_U_S__military_and_civilians_aged_17_44years_reported_to_the_Vaccine_Adverse_Event_Reporting_System_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(16)30592-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -