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HIV-related stigma in pregnancy and early postpartum of mothers living with HIV in Ontario, Canada.
AIDS Care 2017; 29(2):137-144AC

Abstract

HIV-related stigma is associated with many psychological challenges; however, minimal research has explored how perceived HIV-related stigma intersects with psychosocial issues that mothers living with HIV may experience including depression, perceived stress and social isolation. The present study aims to describe the correlates and predictors of HIV-related stigma in a cohort of women living with HIV (WLWH) from across Ontario, Canada during pregnancy and early postpartum. From March 2011 to December 2012, WLWH ≥ 18 years (n = 77) completed a study instrument measuring independent variables including sociodemographic characteristics, perceived stress, depression symptoms, social isolation, social support and perceived racism in the third trimester and 3, 6 and 12 months postpartum. Multivariable linear regression was employed to explore the relationship between HIV-related stigma and multiple independent variables. HIV-related stigma generally increased from pregnancy to postpartum; however, there were no significant differences in HIV-related stigma across all study time points. In multivariable regression, depression symptoms and perceived racism were significant predictors of overall HIV-related stigma from pregnancy to postpartum. The present analysis contributes to our understanding of HIV-related stigma throughout the pregnancy-motherhood trajectory for WLWH including the interactional relationship between HIV-related stigma and other psychosocial variables, most notably, depression and racism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a School of Social Work , McMaster University , Hamilton , Ontario , Canada.b Department of Psychology , Ryerson University , Toronto , Ontario , Canada.a School of Social Work , McMaster University , Hamilton , Ontario , Canada.c Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital , Toronto , Ontario , Canada. d Department of Medicine , University of Toronto , Toronto , Ontario , Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27449254

Citation

Ion, Allyson, et al. "HIV-related Stigma in Pregnancy and Early Postpartum of Mothers Living With HIV in Ontario, Canada." AIDS Care, vol. 29, no. 2, 2017, pp. 137-144.
Ion A, Wagner AC, Greene S, et al. HIV-related stigma in pregnancy and early postpartum of mothers living with HIV in Ontario, Canada. AIDS Care. 2017;29(2):137-144.
Ion, A., Wagner, A. C., Greene, S., & Loutfy, M. R. (2017). HIV-related stigma in pregnancy and early postpartum of mothers living with HIV in Ontario, Canada. AIDS Care, 29(2), pp. 137-144.
Ion A, et al. HIV-related Stigma in Pregnancy and Early Postpartum of Mothers Living With HIV in Ontario, Canada. AIDS Care. 2017;29(2):137-144. PubMed PMID: 27449254.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - HIV-related stigma in pregnancy and early postpartum of mothers living with HIV in Ontario, Canada. AU - Ion,Allyson, AU - Wagner,Anne C, AU - Greene,Saara, AU - Loutfy,Mona R, AU - ,, Y1 - 2016/07/22/ PY - 2016/7/28/pubmed PY - 2017/7/8/medline PY - 2016/7/25/entrez KW - HIV KW - Women KW - postpartum KW - pregnancy KW - stigma SP - 137 EP - 144 JF - AIDS care JO - AIDS Care VL - 29 IS - 2 N2 - HIV-related stigma is associated with many psychological challenges; however, minimal research has explored how perceived HIV-related stigma intersects with psychosocial issues that mothers living with HIV may experience including depression, perceived stress and social isolation. The present study aims to describe the correlates and predictors of HIV-related stigma in a cohort of women living with HIV (WLWH) from across Ontario, Canada during pregnancy and early postpartum. From March 2011 to December 2012, WLWH ≥ 18 years (n = 77) completed a study instrument measuring independent variables including sociodemographic characteristics, perceived stress, depression symptoms, social isolation, social support and perceived racism in the third trimester and 3, 6 and 12 months postpartum. Multivariable linear regression was employed to explore the relationship between HIV-related stigma and multiple independent variables. HIV-related stigma generally increased from pregnancy to postpartum; however, there were no significant differences in HIV-related stigma across all study time points. In multivariable regression, depression symptoms and perceived racism were significant predictors of overall HIV-related stigma from pregnancy to postpartum. The present analysis contributes to our understanding of HIV-related stigma throughout the pregnancy-motherhood trajectory for WLWH including the interactional relationship between HIV-related stigma and other psychosocial variables, most notably, depression and racism. SN - 1360-0451 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27449254/HIV_related_stigma_in_pregnancy_and_early_postpartum_of_mothers_living_with_HIV_in_Ontario_Canada_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09540121.2016.1211608 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -