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Therapy modalities to reduce lymphoedema in female breast cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Breast Cancer Res Treat 2016; 159(1):1-14BC

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of compression bandages, sleeves, intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) and active exercise on the reduction of breast cancer-related lymphoedema (BCRL). A systematic literature search up to the year January 2016 was performed in CINAHL, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO), PEDro and PubMed. Inclusion criteria were (1) RCTs, (2) reported adequate statistics for meta-analysis, (3) English or German language. Exclusion criteria were (1) effects of drugs, hormonal, radiation and surgical procedures, (2) studies with children, (3) non-breast cancers, lower extremity oedema, (4) impact on fatigue only, diets or sexually transmitted diseases, (5) cost-analysis only and (6) non-carcinogenic syndromes or (7) prevention of breast cancer. After scoring the methodological quality of the selected studies, data concerning volume reduction of the oedema swelling were extracted. Thirty-two studies were included in this systematic review. Nine studies were selected for the RCT-based studies and 19 studies were included in the pre-post studies-based random-effects meta-analyses. All conclusions should be taken with precautions because of the insufficient quality of the selected papers. Exercise seems beneficial in reducing oedema volume in BCRL. IPC seems beneficial in helping to reduce the oedema volume in the acute phase of treatment. Compression sleeves do not aid in the volume reduction in the acute phase; however, they do prevent additional swelling.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Discipline of Physiotherapy, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland. slavko.rogan@bfh.ch. Academy of integrative Physiotherapy and Training Education, Grenzach-Wyhlen, Germany. slavko.rogan@bfh.ch.Discipline of Physiotherapy, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland. Faculty for Sports and Rehabilitation Science, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.Discipline of Physiotherapy, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland.Discipline of Physiotherapy, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland.Discipline of Physiotherapy, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland.Rehabilitation Sciences & Physiotherapy, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27460637

Citation

Rogan, Slavko, et al. "Therapy Modalities to Reduce Lymphoedema in Female Breast Cancer Patients: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, vol. 159, no. 1, 2016, pp. 1-14.
Rogan S, Taeymans J, Luginbuehl H, et al. Therapy modalities to reduce lymphoedema in female breast cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2016;159(1):1-14.
Rogan, S., Taeymans, J., Luginbuehl, H., Aebi, M., Mahnig, S., & Gebruers, N. (2016). Therapy modalities to reduce lymphoedema in female breast cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 159(1), pp. 1-14. doi:10.1007/s10549-016-3919-4.
Rogan S, et al. Therapy Modalities to Reduce Lymphoedema in Female Breast Cancer Patients: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2016;159(1):1-14. PubMed PMID: 27460637.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Therapy modalities to reduce lymphoedema in female breast cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Rogan,Slavko, AU - Taeymans,Jan, AU - Luginbuehl,Helena, AU - Aebi,Martina, AU - Mahnig,Sara, AU - Gebruers,Nick, Y1 - 2016/07/26/ PY - 2016/07/16/received PY - 2016/07/16/accepted PY - 2016/7/28/entrez PY - 2016/7/28/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline KW - Axillary dissection or breast cancer KW - Lymphoedema KW - Mastectomy KW - Women SP - 1 EP - 14 JF - Breast cancer research and treatment JO - Breast Cancer Res. Treat. VL - 159 IS - 1 N2 - The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of compression bandages, sleeves, intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) and active exercise on the reduction of breast cancer-related lymphoedema (BCRL). A systematic literature search up to the year January 2016 was performed in CINAHL, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO), PEDro and PubMed. Inclusion criteria were (1) RCTs, (2) reported adequate statistics for meta-analysis, (3) English or German language. Exclusion criteria were (1) effects of drugs, hormonal, radiation and surgical procedures, (2) studies with children, (3) non-breast cancers, lower extremity oedema, (4) impact on fatigue only, diets or sexually transmitted diseases, (5) cost-analysis only and (6) non-carcinogenic syndromes or (7) prevention of breast cancer. After scoring the methodological quality of the selected studies, data concerning volume reduction of the oedema swelling were extracted. Thirty-two studies were included in this systematic review. Nine studies were selected for the RCT-based studies and 19 studies were included in the pre-post studies-based random-effects meta-analyses. All conclusions should be taken with precautions because of the insufficient quality of the selected papers. Exercise seems beneficial in reducing oedema volume in BCRL. IPC seems beneficial in helping to reduce the oedema volume in the acute phase of treatment. Compression sleeves do not aid in the volume reduction in the acute phase; however, they do prevent additional swelling. SN - 1573-7217 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27460637/Therapy_modalities_to_reduce_lymphoedema_in_female_breast_cancer_patients:_a_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-016-3919-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -