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The Association of Religious Affiliation with Overweight/Obesity Among South Asians: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study.
J Relig Health. 2018 Feb; 57(1):33-46.JR

Abstract

Religiosity has been associated with greater body weight. Less is known about South Asian religions and associations with weight. Cross-sectional analysis of the MASALA study (n = 906). We examined associations between religious affiliation and overweight/obesity after controlling for age, sex, years lived in the USA, marital status, education, insurance status, health status, and smoking. We determined whether traditional cultural beliefs, physical activity, and dietary pattern mediated this association. The mean BMI was 26 kg/m2. Religious affiliation was associated with overweight/obesity for Hindus (OR 2.12; 95 % CI: 1.16, 3.89), Sikhs (OR 4.23; 95 % CI: 1.72, 10.38), and Muslims (OR 2.79; 95 % CI: 1.14, 6.80) compared with no religious affiliation. Traditional cultural beliefs (7 %), dietary pattern (1 %), and physical activity (1 %) mediated 9 % of the relationship. Interventions designed to promote healthy lifestyle changes to reduce the burden of overweight/obesity among South Asians need to be culturally and religiously tailored.

Authors+Show Affiliations

RAND Corporation, 1200 S. Hayes Street, Arlington, VA, 2202-5050, USA.Department Cancer Prevention and Control Res/FSPH and JCCC, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, BOX 956900, A2-125 CHS, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6900, USA.UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine, 1545 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, CA, 94115, USA.Department of General Internal Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N Lake Shore Drive, 10th Floor, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine, 1545 Divisadero Street, Suite 311, San Francisco, CA, 94115, USA. alka.kanaya@ucsf.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27460674

Citation

Bharmal, Nazleen H., et al. "The Association of Religious Affiliation With Overweight/Obesity Among South Asians: the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study." Journal of Religion and Health, vol. 57, no. 1, 2018, pp. 33-46.
Bharmal NH, McCarthy WJ, Gadgil MD, et al. The Association of Religious Affiliation with Overweight/Obesity Among South Asians: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. J Relig Health. 2018;57(1):33-46.
Bharmal, N. H., McCarthy, W. J., Gadgil, M. D., Kandula, N. R., & Kanaya, A. M. (2018). The Association of Religious Affiliation with Overweight/Obesity Among South Asians: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. Journal of Religion and Health, 57(1), 33-46. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-016-0290-z
Bharmal NH, et al. The Association of Religious Affiliation With Overweight/Obesity Among South Asians: the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. J Relig Health. 2018;57(1):33-46. PubMed PMID: 27460674.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Association of Religious Affiliation with Overweight/Obesity Among South Asians: The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study. AU - Bharmal,Nazleen H, AU - McCarthy,William J, AU - Gadgil,Meghana D, AU - Kandula,Namratha R, AU - Kanaya,Alka M, PY - 2016/7/28/pubmed PY - 2019/1/18/medline PY - 2016/7/28/entrez KW - Obesity KW - Overweight KW - Religious affiliation KW - South Asian SP - 33 EP - 46 JF - Journal of religion and health JO - J Relig Health VL - 57 IS - 1 N2 - Religiosity has been associated with greater body weight. Less is known about South Asian religions and associations with weight. Cross-sectional analysis of the MASALA study (n = 906). We examined associations between religious affiliation and overweight/obesity after controlling for age, sex, years lived in the USA, marital status, education, insurance status, health status, and smoking. We determined whether traditional cultural beliefs, physical activity, and dietary pattern mediated this association. The mean BMI was 26 kg/m2. Religious affiliation was associated with overweight/obesity for Hindus (OR 2.12; 95 % CI: 1.16, 3.89), Sikhs (OR 4.23; 95 % CI: 1.72, 10.38), and Muslims (OR 2.79; 95 % CI: 1.14, 6.80) compared with no religious affiliation. Traditional cultural beliefs (7 %), dietary pattern (1 %), and physical activity (1 %) mediated 9 % of the relationship. Interventions designed to promote healthy lifestyle changes to reduce the burden of overweight/obesity among South Asians need to be culturally and religiously tailored. SN - 1573-6571 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27460674/The_Association_of_Religious_Affiliation_with_Overweight/Obesity_Among_South_Asians:_The_Mediators_of_Atherosclerosis_in_South_Asians_Living_in_America__MASALA__Study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10943-016-0290-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -