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Learning and Memory in Adolescent Moderate, Binge, and Extreme-Binge Drinkers.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2016 09; 40(9):1895-904.AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Binge drinking has been linked to neurocognitive disadvantages in youth, but it is unclear whether drinking at particularly heavy levels uniquely affects neurocognitive performance. This study prospectively examined (1) whether initiating moderate, binge, or extreme-binge drinking in adolescence differentially influences subsequent learning and memory performances, and (2) whether dosage of alcohol consumption is linearly associated with changes in learning and memory over 6 years of adolescence.

METHODS

Participants, who later transitioned into drinking, were administered verbal learning and memory (VLM) assessments at project intake prior to the onset of substance use (age 12 to 16 years), and at follow-up approximately 6 years later (N = 112). Participants were grouped based on alcohol involvement at follow-up as follows: moderate (≤4 drinks per occasion), binge (5+ drinks per occasion), or extreme-binge (10+ drinks per occasion) drinkers.

RESULTS

Despite equivalent performances prior to onset of drinking, extreme-binge drinkers performed worse than moderate drinkers on verbal learning, and cued and free short delayed recall (ps < 0.05); binge drinkers did not differ from the other groups. No distinct thresholds in alcohol quantity to differentiate the 3 groups were detected, but estimated peak blood alcohol concentrations were linearly associated with verbal learning (β^ = -0.24), and immediate (β^ = -0.27), short delay free (β^ = -0.28) and cued (β^ = -0.30), and long delay free (β^ = -0.24) and cued (β^ = -0.27) recall (ps < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Drinking quantity during adolescence appears to adversely affect VLM in a dose-dependent manner. The acquisition of new verbal information may be particularly affected, notably for those who initiated drinking 10+ drinks in an occasion. Although classification of drinkers into categories remains critical in the study of alcohol, it is important to consider that subtle differences may exist within drinking categories.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California. San Diego State University/University of California San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego, California.Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.San Diego State University/University of California San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego, California. Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, California.Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California.Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California. San Diego State University/University of California San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego, California.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27462830

Citation

Nguyen-Louie, Tam T., et al. "Learning and Memory in Adolescent Moderate, Binge, and Extreme-Binge Drinkers." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 40, no. 9, 2016, pp. 1895-904.
Nguyen-Louie TT, Tracas A, Squeglia LM, et al. Learning and Memory in Adolescent Moderate, Binge, and Extreme-Binge Drinkers. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2016;40(9):1895-904.
Nguyen-Louie, T. T., Tracas, A., Squeglia, L. M., Matt, G. E., Eberson-Shumate, S., & Tapert, S. F. (2016). Learning and Memory in Adolescent Moderate, Binge, and Extreme-Binge Drinkers. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 40(9), 1895-904. https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.13160
Nguyen-Louie TT, et al. Learning and Memory in Adolescent Moderate, Binge, and Extreme-Binge Drinkers. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2016;40(9):1895-904. PubMed PMID: 27462830.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Learning and Memory in Adolescent Moderate, Binge, and Extreme-Binge Drinkers. AU - Nguyen-Louie,Tam T, AU - Tracas,Ashley, AU - Squeglia,Lindsay M, AU - Matt,Georg E, AU - Eberson-Shumate,Sonja, AU - Tapert,Susan F, Y1 - 2016/07/27/ PY - 2016/01/23/received PY - 2016/06/21/accepted PY - 2016/7/28/entrez PY - 2016/7/28/pubmed PY - 2017/12/16/medline KW - Adolescence KW - Binge Drinking KW - Extreme-Binge Drinking KW - Learning and Memory SP - 1895 EP - 904 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 40 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Binge drinking has been linked to neurocognitive disadvantages in youth, but it is unclear whether drinking at particularly heavy levels uniquely affects neurocognitive performance. This study prospectively examined (1) whether initiating moderate, binge, or extreme-binge drinking in adolescence differentially influences subsequent learning and memory performances, and (2) whether dosage of alcohol consumption is linearly associated with changes in learning and memory over 6 years of adolescence. METHODS: Participants, who later transitioned into drinking, were administered verbal learning and memory (VLM) assessments at project intake prior to the onset of substance use (age 12 to 16 years), and at follow-up approximately 6 years later (N = 112). Participants were grouped based on alcohol involvement at follow-up as follows: moderate (≤4 drinks per occasion), binge (5+ drinks per occasion), or extreme-binge (10+ drinks per occasion) drinkers. RESULTS: Despite equivalent performances prior to onset of drinking, extreme-binge drinkers performed worse than moderate drinkers on verbal learning, and cued and free short delayed recall (ps < 0.05); binge drinkers did not differ from the other groups. No distinct thresholds in alcohol quantity to differentiate the 3 groups were detected, but estimated peak blood alcohol concentrations were linearly associated with verbal learning (β^ = -0.24), and immediate (β^ = -0.27), short delay free (β^ = -0.28) and cued (β^ = -0.30), and long delay free (β^ = -0.24) and cued (β^ = -0.27) recall (ps < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Drinking quantity during adolescence appears to adversely affect VLM in a dose-dependent manner. The acquisition of new verbal information may be particularly affected, notably for those who initiated drinking 10+ drinks in an occasion. Although classification of drinkers into categories remains critical in the study of alcohol, it is important to consider that subtle differences may exist within drinking categories. SN - 1530-0277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27462830/Learning_and_Memory_in_Adolescent_Moderate_Binge_and_Extreme_Binge_Drinkers_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.13160 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -