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The Facial Appearance of CEOs: Faces Signal Selection but Not Performance.
PLoS One. 2016; 11(7):e0159950.Plos

Abstract

Research overwhelmingly shows that facial appearance predicts leader selection. However, the evidence on the relevance of faces for actual leader ability and consequently performance is inconclusive. By using a state-of-the-art, objective measure for face recognition, we test the predictive value of CEOs' faces for firm performance in a large sample of faces. We first compare the faces of Fortune500 CEOs with those of US citizens and professors. We find clear confirmation that CEOs do look different when compared to citizens or professors, replicating the finding that faces matter for selection. More importantly, we also find that faces of CEOs of top performing firms do not differ from other CEOs. Based on our advanced face recognition method, our results suggest that facial appearance matters for leader selection but that it does not do so for leader performance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.SCS-Services Cyber Security and Safety Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27462986

Citation

Stoker, Janka I., et al. "The Facial Appearance of CEOs: Faces Signal Selection but Not Performance." PloS One, vol. 11, no. 7, 2016, pp. e0159950.
Stoker JI, Garretsen H, Spreeuwers LJ. The Facial Appearance of CEOs: Faces Signal Selection but Not Performance. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(7):e0159950.
Stoker, J. I., Garretsen, H., & Spreeuwers, L. J. (2016). The Facial Appearance of CEOs: Faces Signal Selection but Not Performance. PloS One, 11(7), e0159950. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159950
Stoker JI, Garretsen H, Spreeuwers LJ. The Facial Appearance of CEOs: Faces Signal Selection but Not Performance. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(7):e0159950. PubMed PMID: 27462986.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Facial Appearance of CEOs: Faces Signal Selection but Not Performance. AU - Stoker,Janka I, AU - Garretsen,Harry, AU - Spreeuwers,Luuk J, Y1 - 2016/07/27/ PY - 2016/01/05/received PY - 2016/07/11/accepted PY - 2016/7/28/entrez PY - 2016/7/28/pubmed PY - 2017/7/25/medline SP - e0159950 EP - e0159950 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 11 IS - 7 N2 - Research overwhelmingly shows that facial appearance predicts leader selection. However, the evidence on the relevance of faces for actual leader ability and consequently performance is inconclusive. By using a state-of-the-art, objective measure for face recognition, we test the predictive value of CEOs' faces for firm performance in a large sample of faces. We first compare the faces of Fortune500 CEOs with those of US citizens and professors. We find clear confirmation that CEOs do look different when compared to citizens or professors, replicating the finding that faces matter for selection. More importantly, we also find that faces of CEOs of top performing firms do not differ from other CEOs. Based on our advanced face recognition method, our results suggest that facial appearance matters for leader selection but that it does not do so for leader performance. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27462986/The_Facial_Appearance_of_CEOs:_Faces_Signal_Selection_but_Not_Performance_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159950 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -