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Variable Resistance Training Promotes Greater Strength and Power Adaptations Than Traditional Resistance Training in Elite Youth Rugby League Players.
J Strength Cond Res. 2017 Apr; 31(4):947-955.JS

Abstract

Rivière, M, Louit, L, Strokosch, A, and Seitz, LB. Variable resistance training promotes greater strength and power adaptations than traditional resistance training in elite youth rugby league players. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 947-955, 2017-The purpose of this study was to examine the strength, velocity, and power adaptations in youth rugby league players in response to a variable resistance training (VRT) or traditional free-weight resistance training (TRAD) intervention. Sixteen elite youth players were assigned to a VRT or TRAD group and completed 2 weekly upper- and lower-body strength and power sessions for 6 weeks. Training programs were identical except that the VRT group trained the bench press exercise with 20% of the prescribed load coming from elastic bands. Bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and bench press mean velocity and power at 35, 45, 65, 75, and 85% of 1RM were measured before and after the training intervention, and the magnitude of the changes was determined using effect sizes (ESs). The VRT group experienced larger increases in both absolute (ES = 0.46 vs. 0.20) and relative (ES = 0.41 vs. 0.19) bench press 1RM. Similar results were observed for mean velocity as well as both absolute and relative mean power at 35, 45, 65, 75, and 85% of 1RM. Furthermore, both groups experienced large gains in both velocity and power in the heavier loads but small improvements in the lighter loads. The improvements in both velocity and power against the heavier loads were larger for the VRT group, whereas smaller differences existed between the 2 groups in the lighter loads. Variable resistance training using elastic bands may offer a greater training stimulus than traditional free-weight resistance training to improve upper-body strength, velocity, and power in elite youth rugby league players.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Catalans Dragons, Perpignan, France; 2University Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France; 3University of Gloucestershire, Cheltenham, United Kingdom; and 4Center for Exercise and Sport Science Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27465633

Citation

Rivière, Maxence, et al. "Variable Resistance Training Promotes Greater Strength and Power Adaptations Than Traditional Resistance Training in Elite Youth Rugby League Players." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 31, no. 4, 2017, pp. 947-955.
Rivière M, Louit L, Strokosch A, et al. Variable Resistance Training Promotes Greater Strength and Power Adaptations Than Traditional Resistance Training in Elite Youth Rugby League Players. J Strength Cond Res. 2017;31(4):947-955.
Rivière, M., Louit, L., Strokosch, A., & Seitz, L. B. (2017). Variable Resistance Training Promotes Greater Strength and Power Adaptations Than Traditional Resistance Training in Elite Youth Rugby League Players. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 31(4), 947-955. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001574
Rivière M, et al. Variable Resistance Training Promotes Greater Strength and Power Adaptations Than Traditional Resistance Training in Elite Youth Rugby League Players. J Strength Cond Res. 2017;31(4):947-955. PubMed PMID: 27465633.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Variable Resistance Training Promotes Greater Strength and Power Adaptations Than Traditional Resistance Training in Elite Youth Rugby League Players. AU - Rivière,Maxence, AU - Louit,Loic, AU - Strokosch,Alasdair, AU - Seitz,Laurent B, PY - 2016/7/29/pubmed PY - 2017/5/16/medline PY - 2016/7/29/entrez SP - 947 EP - 955 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 31 IS - 4 N2 - Rivière, M, Louit, L, Strokosch, A, and Seitz, LB. Variable resistance training promotes greater strength and power adaptations than traditional resistance training in elite youth rugby league players. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 947-955, 2017-The purpose of this study was to examine the strength, velocity, and power adaptations in youth rugby league players in response to a variable resistance training (VRT) or traditional free-weight resistance training (TRAD) intervention. Sixteen elite youth players were assigned to a VRT or TRAD group and completed 2 weekly upper- and lower-body strength and power sessions for 6 weeks. Training programs were identical except that the VRT group trained the bench press exercise with 20% of the prescribed load coming from elastic bands. Bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and bench press mean velocity and power at 35, 45, 65, 75, and 85% of 1RM were measured before and after the training intervention, and the magnitude of the changes was determined using effect sizes (ESs). The VRT group experienced larger increases in both absolute (ES = 0.46 vs. 0.20) and relative (ES = 0.41 vs. 0.19) bench press 1RM. Similar results were observed for mean velocity as well as both absolute and relative mean power at 35, 45, 65, 75, and 85% of 1RM. Furthermore, both groups experienced large gains in both velocity and power in the heavier loads but small improvements in the lighter loads. The improvements in both velocity and power against the heavier loads were larger for the VRT group, whereas smaller differences existed between the 2 groups in the lighter loads. Variable resistance training using elastic bands may offer a greater training stimulus than traditional free-weight resistance training to improve upper-body strength, velocity, and power in elite youth rugby league players. SN - 1533-4287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27465633/Variable_Resistance_Training_Promotes_Greater_Strength_and_Power_Adaptations_Than_Traditional_Resistance_Training_in_Elite_Youth_Rugby_League_Players_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001574 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -