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Food Insecurity Is Associated with Subsequent Cognitive Decline in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study.
J Nutr 2016; 146(9):1740-5JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Living with hunger and fear of not having enough food is a growing worldwide concern. In our previous cross-sectional study, we found that food insecurity was associated with poor cognitive function, but the direction of this relation remains unclear.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated whether food insecurity is associated with subsequent cognitive decline.

METHODS

This was a longitudinal study of 597 participants aged 40-75 y from the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study cohort, with a Mini-Mental State Examination score of ≥24 at baseline. Food security was assessed at baseline with the US Household Food Security Scale. Participants completed cognitive batteries, which included 7 cognitive tests, twice-at baseline and again at a 2-y follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in global cognitive function over 2 y. Multiple linear regression was used to obtain adjusted mean differences and 95% CIs in cognitive decline across baseline food security status.

RESULTS

Food insecurity at baseline was associated with a 2-y decline in global cognitive function (P-trend = 0.03) after adjusting for relevant potential confounders, including age, sex, baseline cognitive score, body mass index, education, poverty, acculturation score, depression score, smoking status, use of alcohol, physical activity score, presence of diabetes and hypertension, apolipoprotein E status, plasma homocysteine, healthy eating index, and time between baseline and follow-up measures. Compared with the food-secure group, the decline in the very low food security group was greater [mean difference: -0.26 (95% CI: -0.41, -0.10)]. Baseline food insecurity was significantly associated with a faster decline in executive function (P-trend = 0.02) but not memory function (P-trend = 0.66).

CONCLUSIONS

Food insecurity was associated with faster cognitive decline in this cohort of Puerto Rican adults. Our study emphasizes the importance of developing interventions for food insecurity that take into account the impact of food insecurity on cognition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA; Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA;Tufts Medical Center and.Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA;Department of Global Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL;Department of Clinical Laboratory and Nutritional Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA; and.Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA xxg14@psu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27466603

Citation

Wong, Janice C., et al. "Food Insecurity Is Associated With Subsequent Cognitive Decline in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 146, no. 9, 2016, pp. 1740-5.
Wong JC, Scott T, Wilde P, et al. Food Insecurity Is Associated with Subsequent Cognitive Decline in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study. J Nutr. 2016;146(9):1740-5.
Wong, J. C., Scott, T., Wilde, P., Li, Y. G., Tucker, K. L., & Gao, X. (2016). Food Insecurity Is Associated with Subsequent Cognitive Decline in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study. The Journal of Nutrition, 146(9), pp. 1740-5. doi:10.3945/jn.115.228700.
Wong JC, et al. Food Insecurity Is Associated With Subsequent Cognitive Decline in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study. J Nutr. 2016;146(9):1740-5. PubMed PMID: 27466603.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food Insecurity Is Associated with Subsequent Cognitive Decline in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study. AU - Wong,Janice C, AU - Scott,Tammy, AU - Wilde,Parke, AU - Li,Yin-Ge, AU - Tucker,Katherine L, AU - Gao,Xiang, Y1 - 2016/07/27/ PY - 2016/01/05/received PY - 2016/06/22/accepted PY - 2016/7/29/entrez PY - 2016/7/29/pubmed PY - 2017/6/28/medline KW - cognitive decline KW - dementia KW - epidemiology KW - nutrition KW - public health SP - 1740 EP - 5 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 146 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Living with hunger and fear of not having enough food is a growing worldwide concern. In our previous cross-sectional study, we found that food insecurity was associated with poor cognitive function, but the direction of this relation remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether food insecurity is associated with subsequent cognitive decline. METHODS: This was a longitudinal study of 597 participants aged 40-75 y from the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study cohort, with a Mini-Mental State Examination score of ≥24 at baseline. Food security was assessed at baseline with the US Household Food Security Scale. Participants completed cognitive batteries, which included 7 cognitive tests, twice-at baseline and again at a 2-y follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in global cognitive function over 2 y. Multiple linear regression was used to obtain adjusted mean differences and 95% CIs in cognitive decline across baseline food security status. RESULTS: Food insecurity at baseline was associated with a 2-y decline in global cognitive function (P-trend = 0.03) after adjusting for relevant potential confounders, including age, sex, baseline cognitive score, body mass index, education, poverty, acculturation score, depression score, smoking status, use of alcohol, physical activity score, presence of diabetes and hypertension, apolipoprotein E status, plasma homocysteine, healthy eating index, and time between baseline and follow-up measures. Compared with the food-secure group, the decline in the very low food security group was greater [mean difference: -0.26 (95% CI: -0.41, -0.10)]. Baseline food insecurity was significantly associated with a faster decline in executive function (P-trend = 0.02) but not memory function (P-trend = 0.66). CONCLUSIONS: Food insecurity was associated with faster cognitive decline in this cohort of Puerto Rican adults. Our study emphasizes the importance of developing interventions for food insecurity that take into account the impact of food insecurity on cognition. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27466603/Food_Insecurity_Is_Associated_with_Subsequent_Cognitive_Decline_in_the_Boston_Puerto_Rican_Health_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.115.228700 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -