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Effects of elevated pCO2 and feeding on net calcification and energy budget of the Mediterranean cold-water coral Madrepora oculata.
J Exp Biol. 2016 10 15; 219(Pt 20):3208-3217.JE

Abstract

Ocean acidification is a major threat to calcifying marine organisms such as deep-sea cold-water corals (CWCs), but related knowledge is scarce. The aragonite saturation threshold (Ωa) for calcification, respiration and organic matter fluxes were investigated experimentally in the Mediterranean Madrepora oculata Over 10 weeks, colonies were maintained under two feeding regimes (uptake of 36.75 and 7.46 µmol C polyp-1 week-1) and exposed in 2 week intervals to a consecutively changing air-CO2 mix (pCO2) of 400, 1600, 800, 2000 and 400 ppm. There was a significant effect of feeding on calcification at initial ambient pCO2, while with consecutive pCO2 treatments, feeding had no effect on calcification. Respiration was not significantly affected by feeding or pCO2 levels. Coral skeletons started to dissolve at an average Ωa threshold of 0.92, but recovered and started to calcify again at Ωa≥1. The surplus energy required to counteract dissolution at elevated pCO2 (≥1600 µatm) was twice that at ambient pCO2 Yet, feeding had no mitigating effect at increasing pCO2 levels. This could be due to the fact that the energy required for calcification is a small fraction (1-3%) of the total metabolic energy demand and corals even under low food conditions might therefore still be able to allocate this small portion of energy to calcification. The response and resistance to ocean acidification are consequently not controlled by feeding in this species, but more likely by chemical reactions at the site of calcification and exchange processes between the calicoblastic layer and ambient seawater.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, Observatoire Océanologique de Villefranche, Villefranche-sur-mer 06230, France maier.conny@gmail.com. CNRS-INSU, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, BP 28, Villefranche-sur-mer 06234, France.Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, Observatoire Océanologique de Villefranche, Villefranche-sur-mer 06230, France. CNRS-INSU, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, BP 28, Villefranche-sur-mer 06234, France.Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, Observatoire Océanologique de Villefranche, Villefranche-sur-mer 06230, France. CNRS-INSU, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, BP 28, Villefranche-sur-mer 06234, France.Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, Observatoire Océanologique de Villefranche, Villefranche-sur-mer 06230, France. CNRS-INSU, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, BP 28, Villefranche-sur-mer 06234, France.University of Bremen, Faculty of Biology & Chemistry, Leobener Strasse, Bremen D-28359, Germany.Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, Observatoire Océanologique de Villefranche, Villefranche-sur-mer 06230, France. CNRS-INSU, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, BP 28, Villefranche-sur-mer 06234, France. Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations, Sciences Po, 27 rue Saint Guillaume, Paris F-75007, France.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27471280

Citation

Maier, Cornelia, et al. "Effects of Elevated pCO2 and Feeding On Net Calcification and Energy Budget of the Mediterranean Cold-water Coral Madrepora Oculata." The Journal of Experimental Biology, vol. 219, no. Pt 20, 2016, pp. 3208-3217.
Maier C, Popp P, Sollfrank N, et al. Effects of elevated pCO2 and feeding on net calcification and energy budget of the Mediterranean cold-water coral Madrepora oculata. J Exp Biol. 2016;219(Pt 20):3208-3217.
Maier, C., Popp, P., Sollfrank, N., Weinbauer, M. G., Wild, C., & Gattuso, J. P. (2016). Effects of elevated pCO2 and feeding on net calcification and energy budget of the Mediterranean cold-water coral Madrepora oculata. The Journal of Experimental Biology, 219(Pt 20), 3208-3217.
Maier C, et al. Effects of Elevated pCO2 and Feeding On Net Calcification and Energy Budget of the Mediterranean Cold-water Coral Madrepora Oculata. J Exp Biol. 2016 10 15;219(Pt 20):3208-3217. PubMed PMID: 27471280.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of elevated pCO2 and feeding on net calcification and energy budget of the Mediterranean cold-water coral Madrepora oculata. AU - Maier,Cornelia, AU - Popp,Pauline, AU - Sollfrank,Nicole, AU - Weinbauer,Markus G, AU - Wild,Christian, AU - Gattuso,Jean-Pierre, Y1 - 2016/07/28/ PY - 2015/06/24/received PY - 2016/07/25/accepted PY - 2016/11/2/pubmed PY - 2017/8/10/medline PY - 2016/7/30/entrez KW - Deep sea KW - Mediterranean Sea KW - Metabolic energy KW - Ocean acidification KW - Scleractinia SP - 3208 EP - 3217 JF - The Journal of experimental biology JO - J. Exp. Biol. VL - 219 IS - Pt 20 N2 - Ocean acidification is a major threat to calcifying marine organisms such as deep-sea cold-water corals (CWCs), but related knowledge is scarce. The aragonite saturation threshold (Ωa) for calcification, respiration and organic matter fluxes were investigated experimentally in the Mediterranean Madrepora oculata Over 10 weeks, colonies were maintained under two feeding regimes (uptake of 36.75 and 7.46 µmol C polyp-1 week-1) and exposed in 2 week intervals to a consecutively changing air-CO2 mix (pCO2) of 400, 1600, 800, 2000 and 400 ppm. There was a significant effect of feeding on calcification at initial ambient pCO2, while with consecutive pCO2 treatments, feeding had no effect on calcification. Respiration was not significantly affected by feeding or pCO2 levels. Coral skeletons started to dissolve at an average Ωa threshold of 0.92, but recovered and started to calcify again at Ωa≥1. The surplus energy required to counteract dissolution at elevated pCO2 (≥1600 µatm) was twice that at ambient pCO2 Yet, feeding had no mitigating effect at increasing pCO2 levels. This could be due to the fact that the energy required for calcification is a small fraction (1-3%) of the total metabolic energy demand and corals even under low food conditions might therefore still be able to allocate this small portion of energy to calcification. The response and resistance to ocean acidification are consequently not controlled by feeding in this species, but more likely by chemical reactions at the site of calcification and exchange processes between the calicoblastic layer and ambient seawater. SN - 1477-9145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27471280/Effects_of_elevated_pCO2_and_feeding_on_net_calcification_and_energy_budget_of_the_Mediterranean_cold_water_coral_Madrepora_oculata_ L2 - http://jeb.biologists.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=27471280 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -