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Case-Control Study of Vaccine Effectiveness in Preventing Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Hospitalizations in Older Adults, United States, 2010-2011.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

 Older adults are at increased risk of influenza-associated complications, including hospitalization, but influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) data are limited for this population. We conducted a case-control study to estimate VE to prevent laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations among adults aged ≥50 years in 11 US Emerging Infections Program hospitalization surveillance sites.

METHODS

 Cases were influenza infections (confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction) in adults aged ≥50 years hospitalized during the 2010-2011 influenza season, identified through Emerging Infections Program surveillance. Community controls, identified through home telephone lists, were matched by age group (±5 years), county, and month of hospitalization for case patients. Vaccination status was determined by self-report (with location and date) or medical records. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate adjusted VE (aVE) estimates (100 × [1 - adjusted odds ratio]), adjusting for sex, race, socioeconomic factors, smoking, chronic medical conditions, recent hospitalization for a respiratory condition, and functional status.

RESULTS

 Among case patients, 205 of 368 (55%) were vaccinated, compared with 489 of 773 controls (63%). Case patients were more likely to be of nonwhite race and more likely to have ≥2 chronic health conditions, a recent hospitalization for a respiratory condition, an income <$35 000, and a lower functional status score (P < .01 for all). The aVE was 56.8% (95% confidence interval, 34.1%-71.7%) and was similar across age groups, including adults ≥75 years (aVE, 57.3%; 15.9%-78.4%).

CONCLUSIONS

 During 2010-2011, influenza vaccination was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalization among adults aged ≥50 years, regardless of age group.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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    Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Battelle Memorial Institute.

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    Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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    Emory University School of Medicine. VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia.

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    Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

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    Connecticut Emerging Infections Program, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven.

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    California Emerging Infections Program, Oakland.

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    University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York.

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    Minnesota Department of Health, St Paul.

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    Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver.

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    Oregon Public Health Division, Portland.

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    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.

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    New York State Department of Health, Albany.

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    New Mexico Department of Health, Santa Fe.

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    Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Case-Control Studies
    Female
    Hospitalization
    Humans
    Immunization
    Influenza Vaccines
    Influenza, Human
    Male
    Middle Aged
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27486114

    Citation

    Havers, Fiona, et al. "Case-Control Study of Vaccine Effectiveness in Preventing Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Hospitalizations in Older Adults, United States, 2010-2011." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 63, no. 10, 2016, pp. 1304-1311.
    Havers F, Sokolow L, Shay DK, et al. Case-Control Study of Vaccine Effectiveness in Preventing Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Hospitalizations in Older Adults, United States, 2010-2011. Clin Infect Dis. 2016;63(10):1304-1311.
    Havers, F., Sokolow, L., Shay, D. K., Farley, M. M., Monroe, M., Meek, J., ... Fry, A. M. (2016). Case-Control Study of Vaccine Effectiveness in Preventing Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Hospitalizations in Older Adults, United States, 2010-2011. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 63(10), pp. 1304-1311.
    Havers F, et al. Case-Control Study of Vaccine Effectiveness in Preventing Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Hospitalizations in Older Adults, United States, 2010-2011. Clin Infect Dis. 2016 Nov 15;63(10):1304-1311. PubMed PMID: 27486114.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Case-Control Study of Vaccine Effectiveness in Preventing Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Hospitalizations in Older Adults, United States, 2010-2011. AU - Havers,Fiona, AU - Sokolow,Leslie, AU - Shay,David K, AU - Farley,Monica M, AU - Monroe,Maya, AU - Meek,James, AU - Daily Kirley,Pam, AU - Bennett,Nancy M, AU - Morin,Craig, AU - Aragon,Deborah, AU - Thomas,Ann, AU - Schaffner,William, AU - Zansky,Shelley M, AU - Baumbach,Joan, AU - Ferdinands,Jill, AU - Fry,Alicia M, Y1 - 2016/08/02/ PY - 2016/03/07/received PY - 2016/07/21/accepted PY - 2016/10/30/pubmed PY - 2017/10/25/medline PY - 2016/8/4/entrez KW - influenza vaccination KW - influenza vaccine effectiveness KW - influenza-associated hospitalization KW - older adults SP - 1304 EP - 1311 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 63 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND:  Older adults are at increased risk of influenza-associated complications, including hospitalization, but influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) data are limited for this population. We conducted a case-control study to estimate VE to prevent laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations among adults aged ≥50 years in 11 US Emerging Infections Program hospitalization surveillance sites. METHODS:  Cases were influenza infections (confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction) in adults aged ≥50 years hospitalized during the 2010-2011 influenza season, identified through Emerging Infections Program surveillance. Community controls, identified through home telephone lists, were matched by age group (±5 years), county, and month of hospitalization for case patients. Vaccination status was determined by self-report (with location and date) or medical records. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate adjusted VE (aVE) estimates (100 × [1 - adjusted odds ratio]), adjusting for sex, race, socioeconomic factors, smoking, chronic medical conditions, recent hospitalization for a respiratory condition, and functional status. RESULTS:  Among case patients, 205 of 368 (55%) were vaccinated, compared with 489 of 773 controls (63%). Case patients were more likely to be of nonwhite race and more likely to have ≥2 chronic health conditions, a recent hospitalization for a respiratory condition, an income <$35 000, and a lower functional status score (P < .01 for all). The aVE was 56.8% (95% confidence interval, 34.1%-71.7%) and was similar across age groups, including adults ≥75 years (aVE, 57.3%; 15.9%-78.4%). CONCLUSIONS:  During 2010-2011, influenza vaccination was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalization among adults aged ≥50 years, regardless of age group. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27486114/Case_Control_Study_of_Vaccine_Effectiveness_in_Preventing_Laboratory_Confirmed_Influenza_Hospitalizations_in_Older_Adults_United_States_2010_2011_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cid/ciw512 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -