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Major Lower Limb Amputations: Experience of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Sri Lanka.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak 2016; 26(7):620-2JC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the epidemiology and conditions frequently seen in major lower extremity amputation.

STUDY DESIGN

Observational study.

PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY

Teaching Hospital Karapitiya, Sri Lanka, from October 2013 to September 2014.

METHODOLOGY

Major lower limb amputations were identified according to ICD-10 criteria. Data was retrospectively collected. Type of the amputation, indication for the amputation, gender and age of the patients, and mortality were noted.

RESULTS

Eighty-five cases of major lower limb amputations were analyzed, including 43 above-knee amputations, 40 below-knee amputations, and 2 through-knee amputations. Most of the patients were in their 7th (38.8%, n=33) and the 8th (21%, n=18) decade of life. Female to male ratio was 1:1.7. Indications of lower extremity amputation were diabetic foot ulcer (37.6%, n=32), peripheral vascular disease (31.7%, n=27), followed by trauma (n=6), acute limb ischemia and infections (n=5 each), chronic osteomyelitis (n=4), tumors (n=3), elephantiasis, pressure sore and chronic wound (n=1 each). Overall diabetes frequency was 52.9% (n=45). In-hospital mortality rate was 9.4%. Main cause of deaths was septicemia.

CONCLUSION

In the study population, major lower limb amputations were more common in males compared to females, with highest incidence in the 7th and 8th decades. Diabetes mellitus contributed to more than 50% of amputations directly or indirectly, and septicemia was responsible for the most mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Colombo South Teaching Hospital, Kalubovila, Sri Lanka.Department of Surgery, Colombo South Teaching Hospital, Kalubovila, Sri Lanka.Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Karapitiya, Sri Lanka.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27504557

Citation

Ubayawansa, D H B., et al. "Major Lower Limb Amputations: Experience of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Sri Lanka." Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons--Pakistan : JCPSP, vol. 26, no. 7, 2016, pp. 620-2.
Ubayawansa DH, Abeysekera WY, Kumara MM. Major Lower Limb Amputations: Experience of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Sri Lanka. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2016;26(7):620-2.
Ubayawansa, D. H., Abeysekera, W. Y., & Kumara, M. M. (2016). Major Lower Limb Amputations: Experience of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Sri Lanka. Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons--Pakistan : JCPSP, 26(7), pp. 620-2. doi:2383.
Ubayawansa DH, Abeysekera WY, Kumara MM. Major Lower Limb Amputations: Experience of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Sri Lanka. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2016;26(7):620-2. PubMed PMID: 27504557.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Major Lower Limb Amputations: Experience of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Sri Lanka. AU - Ubayawansa,D H B, AU - Abeysekera,W Y M, AU - Kumara,M M A J, PY - 2015/05/11/received PY - 2016/03/24/accepted PY - 2016/8/10/entrez PY - 2016/8/10/pubmed PY - 2017/7/1/medline SP - 620 EP - 2 JF - Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons--Pakistan : JCPSP JO - J Coll Physicians Surg Pak VL - 26 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology and conditions frequently seen in major lower extremity amputation. STUDY DESIGN: Observational study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Teaching Hospital Karapitiya, Sri Lanka, from October 2013 to September 2014. METHODOLOGY: Major lower limb amputations were identified according to ICD-10 criteria. Data was retrospectively collected. Type of the amputation, indication for the amputation, gender and age of the patients, and mortality were noted. RESULTS: Eighty-five cases of major lower limb amputations were analyzed, including 43 above-knee amputations, 40 below-knee amputations, and 2 through-knee amputations. Most of the patients were in their 7th (38.8%, n=33) and the 8th (21%, n=18) decade of life. Female to male ratio was 1:1.7. Indications of lower extremity amputation were diabetic foot ulcer (37.6%, n=32), peripheral vascular disease (31.7%, n=27), followed by trauma (n=6), acute limb ischemia and infections (n=5 each), chronic osteomyelitis (n=4), tumors (n=3), elephantiasis, pressure sore and chronic wound (n=1 each). Overall diabetes frequency was 52.9% (n=45). In-hospital mortality rate was 9.4%. Main cause of deaths was septicemia. CONCLUSION: In the study population, major lower limb amputations were more common in males compared to females, with highest incidence in the 7th and 8th decades. Diabetes mellitus contributed to more than 50% of amputations directly or indirectly, and septicemia was responsible for the most mortality. SN - 1681-7168 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27504557/Major_Lower_Limb_Amputations:_Experience_of_a_Tertiary_Care_Hospital_in_Sri_Lanka_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -