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Tinea capitis: temporal shift in pathogens and epidemiology.
J Dtsch Dermatol Ges 2016; 14(8):818-25JD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Tinea capitis is the most common type of dermatomycosis in children. Its pathogen profile shows geographic variations as well as temporal shifts.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Data from 150 patients with mycologically confirmed tinea capitis treated at the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Würzburg, between 1990 and 2014 were analyzed with respect to gender, age, and pathogen spectrum. Two time periods, each 12.5 years long, were compared.

RESULTS

Although tinea capitis was most frequently diagnosed in children between the ages of 0 and 5, the percentage of adults (16 %) was higher than previously reported. The zoophilic dermatophyte Microsporum canis was most frequently identified as the causative agent of tinea capitis. However, there was a rise in infections caused by the anthropophilic fungi Trichophyton tonsurans and Trichophyton rubrum, and also a trend towards a lower percentage of zoophilic versus anthropophilic pathogens. Over the course of time, we observed an increase in the diversity of the pathogen spectrum. Dermatophytes such as Trichophyton soudanense, the Trichophyton anamorph of Arthroderma benhamiae, Trichophyton schoenleinii, and Microsporum audouinii were isolated either for the first time or for the first time after a long hiatus.

CONCLUSIONS

Although Microsporum canis infections still predominate, there has been an increase in anthropophilic pathogens. Given the unexpectedly high percentage of adults, tinea capitis should be included in the differential diagnostic considerations in all age groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, University Hospital Würzburg, Germany.Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, University Hospital Würzburg, Germany.Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, University Hospital Würzburg, Germany.Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, University Hospital Würzburg, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27509419

Citation

Ziegler, Wiebke, et al. "Tinea Capitis: Temporal Shift in Pathogens and Epidemiology." Journal Der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft = Journal of the German Society of Dermatology : JDDG, vol. 14, no. 8, 2016, pp. 818-25.
Ziegler W, Lempert S, Goebeler M, et al. Tinea capitis: temporal shift in pathogens and epidemiology. J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2016;14(8):818-25.
Ziegler, W., Lempert, S., Goebeler, M., & Kolb-Mäurer, A. (2016). Tinea capitis: temporal shift in pathogens and epidemiology. Journal Der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft = Journal of the German Society of Dermatology : JDDG, 14(8), pp. 818-25. doi:10.1111/ddg.12885.
Ziegler W, et al. Tinea Capitis: Temporal Shift in Pathogens and Epidemiology. J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2016;14(8):818-25. PubMed PMID: 27509419.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tinea capitis: temporal shift in pathogens and epidemiology. AU - Ziegler,Wiebke, AU - Lempert,Sigrid, AU - Goebeler,Matthias, AU - Kolb-Mäurer,Annette, PY - 2016/8/11/entrez PY - 2016/8/12/pubmed PY - 2018/4/10/medline SP - 818 EP - 25 JF - Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft = Journal of the German Society of Dermatology : JDDG JO - J Dtsch Dermatol Ges VL - 14 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Tinea capitis is the most common type of dermatomycosis in children. Its pathogen profile shows geographic variations as well as temporal shifts. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data from 150 patients with mycologically confirmed tinea capitis treated at the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Würzburg, between 1990 and 2014 were analyzed with respect to gender, age, and pathogen spectrum. Two time periods, each 12.5 years long, were compared. RESULTS: Although tinea capitis was most frequently diagnosed in children between the ages of 0 and 5, the percentage of adults (16 %) was higher than previously reported. The zoophilic dermatophyte Microsporum canis was most frequently identified as the causative agent of tinea capitis. However, there was a rise in infections caused by the anthropophilic fungi Trichophyton tonsurans and Trichophyton rubrum, and also a trend towards a lower percentage of zoophilic versus anthropophilic pathogens. Over the course of time, we observed an increase in the diversity of the pathogen spectrum. Dermatophytes such as Trichophyton soudanense, the Trichophyton anamorph of Arthroderma benhamiae, Trichophyton schoenleinii, and Microsporum audouinii were isolated either for the first time or for the first time after a long hiatus. CONCLUSIONS: Although Microsporum canis infections still predominate, there has been an increase in anthropophilic pathogens. Given the unexpectedly high percentage of adults, tinea capitis should be included in the differential diagnostic considerations in all age groups. SN - 1610-0387 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27509419/Tinea_capitis:_temporal_shift_in_pathogens_and_epidemiology_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ddg.12885 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -