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Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Sep; 104(3):760-8.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The consumption of sweet beverages has been associated with greater risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which may be involved in the development of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that sweet beverages may increase pancreatic cancer risk as well.

OBJECTIVE

We examined the association between sweet-beverage consumption (including total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink and juice and nectar consumption) and pancreatic cancer risk.

DESIGN

The study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. A total of 477,199 participants (70.2% women) with a mean age of 51 y at baseline were included, and 865 exocrine pancreatic cancers were diagnosed after a median follow-up of 11.60 y (IQR: 10.10-12.60 y). Sweet-beverage consumption was assessed with the use of validated dietary questionnaires at baseline. HRs and 95% CIs were obtained with the use of multivariable Cox regression models that were stratified by age, sex, and center and adjusted for educational level, physical activity, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Associations with total soft-drink consumption were adjusted for juice and nectar consumption and vice versa.

RESULTS

Total soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.07), sugar-sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.02; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.08), and artificially sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.10) were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk (HR per 100 g/d: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99); this association remained statistically significant after adjustment for body size, type 2 diabetes, and energy intake.

CONCLUSIONS

Soft-drink consumption does not seem to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption might be associated with a modest decreased pancreatic cancer risk. Additional studies with specific information on juice and nectar subtypes are warranted to clarify these results.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Miguel Hernández University, Alicante, Spain; The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain;Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Medical Research Institute of Palma, University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain; mariaadoracion.romaguera@ssib.es.Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia;Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA;The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Andalusian School of Public Health. Biomedical Research Institute of Granada; University Hospital of Granada/Granada University, Granada, Spain;Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark;Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark;Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark;Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health team, National Institute for Health and Medical Research, Villejuif, France; UMRS 1018, Université Paris Sud, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France;Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health team, National Institute for Health and Medical Research, Villejuif, France; UMRS 1018, Université Paris Sud, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France;Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health team, National Institute for Health and Medical Research, Villejuif, France; UMRS 1018, Université Paris Sud, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France;Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany;Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany;Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany;Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece;Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece;Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece;Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy;Epidemiology and Prevention Unit. Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy;Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy;Human Genetics Foundation,Torino, Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Torino, Italy;Dipartamento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy;MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands;Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø-the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway;Department of Chronic Diseases, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway;Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø-the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway;Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø-the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland;Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain;Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain;The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Public Health Direction Biodonostia Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain;The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain;The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain;Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit.Department of Public Health and Primary Care, and Clinical Gerontology Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom;Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom;Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom;Nutrition and Metabolism Section, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France;Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands; and.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands; and Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27510540

Citation

Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva M., et al. "Sweet-beverage Consumption and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 104, no. 3, 2016, pp. 760-8.
Navarrete-Muñoz EM, Wark PA, Romaguera D, et al. Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;104(3):760-8.
Navarrete-Muñoz, E. M., Wark, P. A., Romaguera, D., Bhoo-Pathy, N., Michaud, D., Molina-Montes, E., Tjønneland, A., Olsen, A., Overvad, K., Boutron-Ruault, M. C., Clavel-Chapelon, F., Fagherazzi, G., Katzke, V. A., Kühn, T., Steffen, A., Trichopoulou, A., Klinaki, E., Papatesta, E. M., Masala, G., ... Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B. (2016). Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 104(3), 760-8. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.130963
Navarrete-Muñoz EM, et al. Sweet-beverage Consumption and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;104(3):760-8. PubMed PMID: 27510540.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). AU - Navarrete-Muñoz,Eva M, AU - Wark,Petra A, AU - Romaguera,Dora, AU - Bhoo-Pathy,Nirmala, AU - Michaud,Dominique, AU - Molina-Montes,Esther, AU - Tjønneland,Anne, AU - Olsen,Anja, AU - Overvad,Kim, AU - Boutron-Ruault,Marie-Christine, AU - Clavel-Chapelon,Françoise, AU - Fagherazzi,Guy, AU - Katzke,Verena A, AU - Kühn,Tilman, AU - Steffen,Annika, AU - Trichopoulou,Antonia, AU - Klinaki,Eleni, AU - Papatesta,Eleni-Maria, AU - Masala,Giovanna, AU - Krogh,Vittorio, AU - Tumino,Rosario, AU - Naccarati,Alessio, AU - Mattiello,Amalia, AU - Peeters,Petra H, AU - Rylander,Charlotta, AU - Parr,Christine L, AU - Skeie,Guri, AU - Weiderpass,Elisabete, AU - Quirós,J Ramón, AU - Duell,Eric J, AU - Dorronsoro,Miren, AU - Huerta,José María, AU - Ardanaz,Eva, AU - Wareham,Nick, AU - Khaw,Kay-Tee, AU - Travis,Ruth C, AU - Key,Tim, AU - Stepien,Magdalena, AU - Freisling,Heinz, AU - Riboli,Elio, AU - Bueno-de-Mesquita,H Bas, Y1 - 2016/08/10/ PY - 2016/01/21/received PY - 2016/06/23/accepted PY - 2016/8/12/entrez PY - 2016/8/12/pubmed PY - 2017/6/7/medline KW - epidemiology KW - juice and nectar KW - pancreatic cancer KW - prevention KW - risk factors KW - soft drinks KW - sugary drinks KW - sweet beverages SP - 760 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 104 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The consumption of sweet beverages has been associated with greater risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which may be involved in the development of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that sweet beverages may increase pancreatic cancer risk as well. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between sweet-beverage consumption (including total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink and juice and nectar consumption) and pancreatic cancer risk. DESIGN: The study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. A total of 477,199 participants (70.2% women) with a mean age of 51 y at baseline were included, and 865 exocrine pancreatic cancers were diagnosed after a median follow-up of 11.60 y (IQR: 10.10-12.60 y). Sweet-beverage consumption was assessed with the use of validated dietary questionnaires at baseline. HRs and 95% CIs were obtained with the use of multivariable Cox regression models that were stratified by age, sex, and center and adjusted for educational level, physical activity, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Associations with total soft-drink consumption were adjusted for juice and nectar consumption and vice versa. RESULTS: Total soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.07), sugar-sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.02; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.08), and artificially sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.10) were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk (HR per 100 g/d: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99); this association remained statistically significant after adjustment for body size, type 2 diabetes, and energy intake. CONCLUSIONS: Soft-drink consumption does not seem to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption might be associated with a modest decreased pancreatic cancer risk. Additional studies with specific information on juice and nectar subtypes are warranted to clarify these results. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27510540/Sweet_beverage_consumption_and_risk_of_pancreatic_cancer_in_the_European_Prospective_Investigation_into_Cancer_and_Nutrition__EPIC__ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.116.130963 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -